London Holiday Travels

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Christmas tree in front of St. Paul's Cathedral - London, England

Christmas tree in front of St. Paul’s Cathedral

Those of us who are able to revisit countries we’ve visited before are fortunate. Each revisit brings with it a renewed interest in that country. Of course that first trip will always hold a special place in your memories. The next visit may not have that same emotional punch but it may hold even greater surprises. A first time visit often means a hectic itinerary rushing to and from sights and eateries, with nary a break for rest. Follow up trips means that you won’t have that same necessity to see the requisite sights again. You certainly may but there won’t be the same crunch on your time.

National Gallery - London, England

National Gallery

Another visit means exploring areas of the city you didn’t get a chance to the first time. You’re able to eat at different restaurants, or try something else on the menu at a favorite restaurant. The biggest gift in revisiting a country is the opportunity to experience the cities in new ways. Spend time in local coffee shops or parks or even go grocery shopping. Stroll the streets and get in sync with the ebb and flow of the city and how the residents spend their time living there.

Deer in front of Covent Garden Market - London, England

Deer in front of Covent Garden Market

An especially stark contrast is to visit the same city during different times of the year. Doing so can bring an entirely new perspective on a city you thought you knew. You can see how the locals relax under the summer sun versus how they handle snow in the winter. This holds especially true during the winter holiday season as cities are decked out in their festive best. City squares are filled with Christmas market stalls and monuments are decorated.

London Eye Lights - London, England

London Eye Lights

London in December is particularly filled with holiday cheer. Many of the streets, including those leading into Piccadilly Circus, are dressed up in holiday lights and signs. St. Paul’s Cathedral has two Christmas trees, one on each side of the Cathedral. A large tree adorned with lights is lit up in front of the National Gallery as well. Covent Garden Market has a giant topiary reindeer to get visitors into the holiday spirit.

Fireworks and the London Eye - London, England

Fireworks and the London Eye

This festive cheer culminates in a spectacular New Year’s Eve celebration. The best viewing areas are by The Houses of Parliament and Elizabeth Tower (often referred to as Big Ben) and across the riverbank from the London Eye. Along the riverbank are crowds of happy people partying and dancing to music being pumped out on large speakers by local disc jockeys. It is behind the London Eye that an array of fireworks is fired into the night’s sky for a dazzling display at the strike of midnight. After the fireworks show the city of London does a nice job of ushering out the crowds through specific streets and back safely to their hotels and homes. To view London through the lens of the holidays gives visitors a newfound appreciation of this wonderful city.

Wherever in the world you may be celebrating, Check Before You Trek wishes you a very happy holiday and a happy new year! May your next year be full of travels to both new and familiar locations!

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London During the Holidays

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St. Pauls\' Cathedral: 51.513845, -0.098351
National Gallery: 51.508929, -0.128299
Covent Garden Market: 51.511732, -0.123270
Houses of Parliament: 51.499629, -0.124648
The London Eye: 51.503324, -0.119543
Piccadilly Circus: 51.510101, -0.134661
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St. Pauls' Cathedral
London Holiday Travels
St.Pauls' Cathedral, London, United Kingdom
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National Gallery
London Holiday Travels
National Gallery, London, United Kingdom
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Covent Garden Market
London Holiday Travels
Covent Garden, London, United Kingdom
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Houses of Parliament
London Holiday Travels
Houses of Parliament, London, United Kingdom
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The London Eye
London Holiday Travels
London Eye, London, United Kingdom
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Piccadilly Circus
London Holiday Travels
Piccadilly Circus, London, United Kingdom

 

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Oxford, Part Two

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Continued from Oxford, Part One

Tom Tower and Tom Quad at Christ Church - Oxford, England

Tom Tower and Tom Quad at Christ Church

Once you’ve eaten and shopped your way out of Covered Market the walking tour will have you continue on towards St. Martin’s Tower. The locals refer to this monument as Carfax Tower. From here you will head to one of the most popular locations, Christ Church Cathedral and College. The current popularity stems from the fact that various parts of Christ Church were the inspiration for, or actual film locations, for the Harry Potter series. You’ll first pass by Tom Tower, created by the famed English architect Sir Christopher Michael Wren, as you make your way to the entrance to the Christ Church Meadow. The path to the Christ Church Meadow is through the War Memorial Garden. After exiting the War Memorial Garden to your left will be the public entrance to buy tickets into Christ Church.

Turf Tavern - Oxford, England

Turf Tavern

Your ticket gains you access into the Tom Quad, The Great Hall, and the Cathedral. Harry Potter fans will recognize The Great Hall as the inspiration for the dining hall at Hogwarts. Once inside the Cathedral you will want to pick up their pamphlet, “A Brief Tour of the Cathedral”, as it highlights the main points of interest inside the Cathedral. Once done inside take a moment in Tom Quad to soak in your surroundings and breathe in the same air as the Oxford intelligentsia. After Christ Church the walking tour takes you past the Botanic Gardens, which has its own admissions price. You will see other colleges such as Corpus Christ, Merton, and Magdalen.  On New College Lane you will see a bridge that connects two parts of Hertford College. This bridge is known as the Bridge of Sighs, a reference to the bridge of the same name in Venice.

Lamb and Flag Passage - Oxford, England

Lamb and Flag Passage

At this point in your journey you may have a hankering for a pint or pub food. Near the Bridge of Sighs is the famous Turf Tavern, which offers a self-described “education in intoxication”. On a sign by the tavern are the words “If you’ve been to Oxford before, without visiting the Turf, then you haven’t really visited Oxford”. Even famous people have visited the Turf Tavern such as Elizabeth Taylor, Margaret Thatcher, and Ben Kingsley. The Turf Tavern boasts high quality cask ales fresh from the tap. If available be sure to try a pint of the Damson Porter, a smooth on the palate dark beer. If the pub fare at Turf Tavern doesn’t pique your interest head to nearby Holywell Street and The Alternative Tuck Shop. At The Alternative Tuck Shop sandwiches are made to order for takeaway. The chicken tikka with mango chutney on a baguette isn’t spicy but cool and refreshing.

Peek Kai Tod Kraiem at Chiang Mai Kitchen - Oxford, England

Peek Kai Tod Kraiem at Chiang Mai Kitchen

From Holywell Street you will resume your walking tour on Parks Road. You will pass by Wadham College, University Museum, Pitt Rivers Museum of Ethnology, and Keble College. From there the tour will take you through the Lamb and Flag Passage, a tranquil passageway that is charming. Try to capture a peaceful moment in this section of Oxford. If time permits before leaving Oxford you can head back near Covered Market, to the pedestrian zone on Cornmarket Street. Here you can spend time at a coffee shop or explore such stores as H&M, Moss, or Zara. If you decide to have dinner in Oxford try Chiang Mai Kitchen. This authentic Thai restaurant serves up delicious dishes such as Peek Kai Tod Kraiem. Peek Kai Tod Kraiem is a plate of chicken wings fried and slathered with a Thai sweet and spicy sauce. Traditional dishes of Pad Thai and Thai Curry are tasty. At this point your day in Oxford is over and you will walk back to the train station and onwards to your next destination.

 

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Oxford

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University of Oxford: 51.756634, -1.254704
Oxford Railway Station: 51.753288, -1.269913
Ashmolean Museum: 51.755302, -1.260026
Martyrs Memorial: 51.755053, -1.258972
Radcliffe Camera: 51.753425, -1.254012
Covered Market: 51.752195, -1.256583
Christ Church: 51.750643, -1.256597
Bridge of Sighs - Hertford College: 51.754472, -1.253734
Turf Tavern: 51.754685, -1.252968
The Alternative Tuck Shop: 51.755049, -1.251845
Lamb and Flag Passage: 51.757468, -1.258492
Cornmarket Street: 51.752937, -1.258310
Chiang Mai Kitchen: 51.752020, -1.256478
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University of Oxford
Oxford, Part One
University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom
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Oxford Railway Station
Oxford, Part One
Oxford Railway Station, Oxford, United Kingdom
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Ashmolean Museum
Oxford, Part One
Ashmolean Museum, Beaumont Street, Oxford, United Kingdom
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Martyrs Memorial
Oxford, Part One
Martyrs Memorial, Oxford, United Kingdom
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Radcliffe Camera
Oxford, Part One
Radcliffe Camera, Radcliffe Square, Oxford, United Kingdom
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Covered Market
Oxford, Part One
The Covered Market Oxford, Market Street, Oxford, United Kingdom
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Christ Church
Oxford, Part Two
Christ Church, Saint Aldate's, Oxford, UK
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Bridge of Sighs - Hertford College
Oxford, Part Two
Bridge of Sighs, New College Lane, Oxford, United Kingdom
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Turf Tavern
Oxford, Part Two
The Turf Tavern, Bath Place, Oxford, United Kingdom
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The Alternative Tuck Shop
Oxford, Part Two
The Alternative Tuck Shop, Holywell Street, Oxford, United Kingdom
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Lamb and Flag Passage
Oxford, Part Two
Lamb and Flag Passage, Oxford, United Kingdom
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Cornmarket Street
Oxford, Part Two
Cornmarket Street, Oxford, United Kingdom
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Chiang Mai Kitchen
Oxford, Part Two
Chiang Mai Kitchen Ltd, High Street, Oxford, United Kingdom

 

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Oxford, Part One

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The English city of Oxford takes just over an hour by train to reach from London. Oxford is most known for the University of Oxford. The University of Oxford boasts over 30 different colleges within walking distance. Just by being in Oxford one feels smarter as if intelligence is increased by osmosis. You will have the urge to duck into a library to crack open a book and study. Even if you are not a scholar at heart, Oxford’s architecture and serenity make for an enjoyable visit. In addition, Oxford has many eateries well worth your stomach’s time. A perfect escape from London, Oxford should rank high on your itinerary as a day trip.

It is possible to visit the highlights of Oxford in just one day. To help plan out your day when you arrive at the Oxford train station stop by the tourist information booth. This kiosk sells for around 2£ a “Quick Guide – Oxford” pamphlet and map. This guide, produced by Quick Guides Publishers, includes a walking tour that will guide you past the top sights. In the guide it states that the walk takes an hour to complete. The walk will take longer if you move at a more relaxed pace or spend extra time at the various sights. Your level of interest will determine the time you spend exploring the various colleges and sights. The colleges aren’t always open to visitors so that may impact your visiting schedule. Furthermore, leave plenty of time to eat at at least one of the many restaurants in Oxford.

Ashmolean Museum - Oxford, England

Ashmolean Museum

Following the “Quick Guide – Oxford” your walk will begin at the Ashmolean Museum. The museum is a straight shot from the train station, an eleven-minute walk. From the train station continue on Hythe Bridge Street and make a left on to Worcester Street. Stay on Worcester Street and it will turn into Beaumont Street, with the museum on the left-hand side of the street. The Ashmolean Museum is Britain’s first museum, with a focus on art and archeology. Admission to the museum is free so if you enjoy museums you will want to budget in time to explore the museum. The museum is closed on Mondays, but open from 10am to 5pm Tuesdays through Sundays.

Martyrs' Memorial - Oxford, England

Martyrs’ Memorial

Opposite from the Ashmolean Museum is the Martyrs’ Memorial. This monument, and the museum, is where your walk will end so remember this location. The monument is in a central location so it makes for a good meeting place if anyone in your group gets separated. The Martyrs’ Memorial is in front of the first college you’ll see, Balliol. Balliol College is one of the oldest colleges in Oxford. Continue from Balliol College to Broad Street where you will find Trinity College and various stores. Here at these shops you can buy souvenirs such as a University of Oxford sweatshirt. At the opposite end of Broad Street of note is the bookstore Blackwell, Sheldonian Theatre, and the Clarendon Building.

Radcliffe Camera in Radcliffe Square - Oxford, England

Radcliffe Camera in Radcliffe Square

As you pass through Old Schools Quad and by Bodleian Library, you’ll find yourself in Radcliffe Square. Here you will find plenty of tourists with their cameras ready. Radcliffe Square is where you will find Radcliffe Camera, one of Oxford’s most well-known sights. This round building is home to the Radcliffe Science Library. After you’ve taken your photos you’ll find the tour takes you past a few more colleges such as Exeter College, All Souls College, and Brasenose College. At this point in the tour you may find your stomach grumbling and that you’re itching for a snack. Fear not as you should find yourself on Market Street and the Covered Market.

Pieminister - Oxford, England

Pieminister

Covered Market has a slew of food stalls ready to fulfill any craving. If you are in the mood for an English dish stop by Pieminister. Pieminister serves hearty pies baked with fillings such as venison or steak. The pie dough is flakey on the outside and soft in the inside with the meat filling soft and succulent. The meat pie is placed on top of mashed potatoes with gravy pored over for the final touch. For dessert have a fresh baked cookie from Ben’s Cookies. One of Ben’s Cookies may be bought for just under 2£. For sale are cookies made with milk or dark chocolate and classics such as peanut butter or oatmeal raisin. Besides food stalls Covered Market has merchants selling fresh flowers, and butchers selling meats such as sausages and English lamb liver. You will find coffee shops, clothing stores, and even a cobbler. A wide variety of shops and food options are available for your browsing pleasure at Covered Market.

Continued in Oxford, Part Two

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Oxford

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University of Oxford: 51.756634, -1.254704
Oxford Railway Station: 51.753288, -1.269913
Ashmolean Museum: 51.755302, -1.260026
Martyrs Memorial: 51.755053, -1.258972
Radcliffe Camera: 51.753425, -1.254012
Covered Market: 51.752195, -1.256583
Christ Church: 51.750643, -1.256597
Bridge of Sighs - Hertford College: 51.754472, -1.253734
Turf Tavern: 51.754685, -1.252968
The Alternative Tuck Shop: 51.755049, -1.251845
Lamb and Flag Passage: 51.757468, -1.258492
Cornmarket Street: 51.752937, -1.258310
Chiang Mai Kitchen: 51.752020, -1.256478
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University of Oxford
Oxford, Part One
University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom
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Oxford Railway Station
Oxford, Part One
Oxford Railway Station, Oxford, United Kingdom
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Ashmolean Museum
Oxford, Part One
Ashmolean Museum, Beaumont Street, Oxford, United Kingdom
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Martyrs Memorial
Oxford, Part One
Martyrs Memorial, Oxford, United Kingdom
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Radcliffe Camera
Oxford, Part One
Radcliffe Camera, Radcliffe Square, Oxford, United Kingdom
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Covered Market
Oxford, Part One
The Covered Market Oxford, Market Street, Oxford, United Kingdom
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Christ Church
Oxford, Part Two
Christ Church, Saint Aldate's, Oxford, UK
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Bridge of Sighs - Hertford College
Oxford, Part Two
Bridge of Sighs, New College Lane, Oxford, United Kingdom
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Turf Tavern
Oxford, Part Two
The Turf Tavern, Bath Place, Oxford, United Kingdom
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The Alternative Tuck Shop
Oxford, Part Two
The Alternative Tuck Shop, Holywell Street, Oxford, United Kingdom
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Lamb and Flag Passage
Oxford, Part Two
Lamb and Flag Passage, Oxford, United Kingdom
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Cornmarket Street
Oxford, Part Two
Cornmarket Street, Oxford, United Kingdom
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Chiang Mai Kitchen
Oxford, Part Two
Chiang Mai Kitchen Ltd, High Street, Oxford, United Kingdom

 

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Windsor and Eton Brewery

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When I’d reached the legal drinking age I found myself drawn to wine. Intrigued by the many varietals of wine I searched out as much information as I could. I enjoyed visiting wineries for tastings and to learn how wine is produced. Even years later I am still finding new and exciting wines to sample. Although wine production shares many qualities with beer, for many years I wasn’t interested in beer. Over time, I realized it was because I had tried nothing beyond the basic light name brand beer. Once I’d made the conscious decision to expand my beer horizon a whole new realm opened for me. Similar to wine, beer is produced through out the world with many brands and types of beer to try. On my last trip to England I was excited to see what beers the country offered. I looked forward to treating my taste buds to what the English refer to as ‘bitter’ beer.

One city I planned on visiting while in England was Windsor. In researching which sights to see in Windsor I read that the city has a brewery.   Windsor & Eton Brewery is a fifteen-minute walk from the famed Windsor Castle. The brewery’s website mentions that in the past Windsor created fabulous ales. In 1931 the last brewery in the city closed its doors. That is until 2010 when Windsor & Eton Brewery opened. Without hesitation I added the brewery to my list of places to visit. I found the prospect of visiting an up and coming brewery steeped in tradition exciting.

I arrived in Windsor by train via Windsor & Eton Central Station and opted for the scenic route to the brewery. From the train station I made my way to Barry Avenue, with Alexandra Gardens to my left and River Thames to my right. A left at Vansittart Road led me away from the River Thames and into a residential section of Windsor. Continuing on to Duke Street, I passed quaint two-story homes, a group of residences known as the Gardner Cottages. These homes are along Arthur Road, Vansittart Road, and Duke Street. The homes form a square shape with a field in the middle shared by the tenants. The Duke Street section of the square takes up two sides of the square and across the corner of the Duke Streets is the Windsor & Eton Brewery.

Sign for Windsor and Eton Brewery - Windsor, England (Photograph from the website: Check Before You Trek)

Sign for Windsor and Eton Brewery

Windsor & Eton Brewery offers tours twice a week, with tour dates and times available on their website’s event page. I wasn’t in Windsor on a tour day but figured I’d try my luck and stop by the brewery to see if it was open. Windsor & Eton Brewery is in a one-story building. The building’s nondescript outside resembles more an office building than a brewery. A sign on the wall shows that you have arrived at Windsor & Eton Brewery. I entered through the main door into what appeared to be a receptionist space. An employee of the brewery welcomed me and led me into the Windsor & Eton Brewery store. The store has for sale beers, growlers, and merchandise ranging from shirts to key chains.

Various beers for sale at Windsor and Eton Brewery - Windsor, England

Various beers for sale at Windsor and Eton Brewery

While perusing the beers on sale another employee asked if I was interested in tasting a few of the beers the brewery was producing on site. I said yes, and they ushered me into an adjoining room. This immense space was the section of the building where the beers are brewed and bottled. Large brewing tanks and stainless steel beer barrels took up most of the room. One section of the room had a counter set aside for beer tasting.

Brew tanks at Windsor and Eton Brewery - Windsor, England

Brew tanks at Windsor and Eton Brewery

Each of the beers that Windsor & Eton Brewery produces is named in homage to the royal city of Windsor. For example, they have the Knight of the Garter Golden Ale, the Guardsman Best Bitter, and the Conqueror Black IPA. When Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, married Catherine Middleton the brewery created the Windsor Knot Pale Ale. During the tasting the employee told me the history of the brewery and the brewing methods used by the brewery. Of particular note was how beer brewed in England differs from the way beer is brewed in America. To illustrate the point the tasting included a traditional English ‘bitter’ beer. English refer to pale ale as ‘bitter’ beer. This beer is cask ale, which means after brewing in the tanks it goes through a second fermentation in barrels. Due to the cooler climate of England ‘bitter’ beer is served at room temperature but still tastes cool and refreshing. In contrast are keg beers, beer that is pressurized in tanks and kept cold and how most American beers are made. Windsor & Eton brewery makes an American IPA that is served chilled, and it was interesting tasting the ‘bitter’ versus the American IPA. Afterwards I sampled a couple other light and dark beers the brewery produces. Every beer was crisp, full bodied, and wonderful.

Tasting area at Windsor and Eton Brewery - Windsor, England

Tasting area at Windsor and Eton Brewery

After tasting a few beers I went back into the store and purchased bottles of beers I hadn’t had the chance to sample. As I left the Windsor & Eton Brewery I felt humbled. Even though I showed up unannounced, and not at the brewery during a scheduled tour, the employees treated me with such hospitality. In retrospect I wish I had attended a tour. The tours run for ninety minutes, allowing for a more in depth tutorial on the actual brewing techniques used. If you are a fan of beer, or want to learn how beer is produced in England, be sure to visit the Windsor & Eton Brewery.

Display at Windsor and Eton Brewery - Windsor, England

Display at Windsor and Eton Brewery

 

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Windsor and Eton Brewery

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Windsor and Eton Brewery 51.484451, -0.617875 Windsor and Eton Brewery

 

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Dining in Windsor and Eton

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Windsor and Eton makes for an ideal home base for those looking to stay somewhere other than London. By staying in Windsor and Eton one has the luxury of experiencing a different side of England and still be near London. Windsor and Eton has two train stations within walking distance of one another allowing you to reach London by train within thirty to sixty minutes. Besides London, Windsor and Eton as a home base allows for visitors to reach other cities in the South West region of England. Places such as Bath, Oxford, Reading, Salisbury, and Winchester are close train rides away.

A few factors make staying in Windsor and Eton appealing to tourists. Neither town is too large, and you can easily get around both by foot. Although Windsor and Eton are separated by the River Thames a bridge connects the two towns. Windsor receives a fair number of tourists because of Windsor Castle. While Eton is busiest when their boys’ boarding school, Eton College, is in session. After the boys are in their dorms and the tourists have gone back to London, Windsor and Eton are quiet towns. The English charm of Windsor and Eton are not the only appeal to these towns. Several dining options are available, covering a wide variety of cuisines. Listed below are a few of the best restaurants in Windsor and Eton.

Castle Cod

Surrounding Windsor Castle are restaurants that reek of tourist traps. Castle Cod is smack dab in the middle of this row of restaurants but it’d be a mistake to lump it in the tourist trap category. If you’re craving traditional British fish and chips you won’t want to ignore this restaurant. Service is fast and efficient and the fish and chips are classic. The fish is tender with the batter as crispy as the fries. Castle Cod is family friendly and a great place for a quick meal after your tour of Windsor Castle.

Back side of Castle Cod - Windsor, England

Back side of Castle Cod

Fish and Chips at Castle Cod - Windsor, England

Fish and Chips at Castle Cod

Chocolate Theatre Cafe Bar

Chocolate Theatre Cafe Bar offers classic English cuisine in a charming setting. A must on any trip to England is to have scones and Chocolate Theatre Cafe Bar serves scrumptious scones. The scones are served with Windsor Cream Tea, strawberry jam, and fresh clotted cream. Chocolate Theatre Cafe Bar’s menu includes a traditional English breakfast. The traditional English breakfast is a hearty meal of two sausages, ham, scrambled eggs and toast. Another satisfying and filling meal is the Jacket potatoes, served with your choice of toppings. For those with a sweet tooth order one of their specialty hot chocolates. The drink is so decadent you won’t want to reach the last drop.

Scones, strawberry jam, and clotted cream at Chocolate Theatre Cafe Bar - Windsor, England

Scones, strawberry jam, and clotted cream at Chocolate Theatre Cafe Bar

Full English breakfast at Chocolate Theatre Cafe Bar - Windsor, England

Full English breakfast at Chocolate Theatre Cafe Bar

 

Jacket potatoes at Chocolate Theatre Cafe Bar - Windsor, England

Jacket potatoes at Chocolate Theatre Cafe Bar

Specialty hot chocolate at Chocolate Theatre Cafe Bar - Windsor, England

Specialty hot chocolate at Chocolate Theatre Cafe Bar

 

Cote Brasserie

For fine French dining head to Cote Brasserie. Cote Brasserie is ideal for couples as this restaurant exudes a romantic setting. The restaurant is in a two-story building next to the River Thames. You may sit inside or outside, with or without a view of the river. Begin your meal with a bowl of French Onion soup. Main courses include traditional dishes such as Beef Bourguignon, Breton Fish Stew, and Steak Frites. End your satisfying meal with dessert such as Crème Caramel, a silky smooth flan. If you are at Cote Brasserie for dinner enjoy the view of Windsor Castle lit up at night.

Cote Brasserie - Windsor, England

Cote Brasserie

French Onion Soup at Cote Brasserie - Windsor, England

French Onion Soup at Cote Brasserie

 

Flaming Cow

If you have a hankering for grub that will remind you of being back in America head to the restaurant Flaming Cow. The Flaming Cow cooks up mouth-watering hamburgers made with 6oz beef patties and various toppings. You can order hot dogs that are as large as the hamburgers and just as tasty. Compliment your meal with fries and a milkshake. The Flaming Cow’s relaxed atmosphere is magnified with a mural painting of a large cow scaling a building, a la King Kong, with planes buzzing around the cow.

Brunch Burger at Flaming Cow - Windsor and Eton, England

Brunch Burger at Flaming Cow

Cuban Hot Dog at Flaming Cow - Windsor and Eton, England

Cuban Hot Dog at Flaming Cow

Viva L’Italia

A drawback to visiting Italy is that it ruins Italian food for you in your home country. Nothing compares to how Italian food is prepared and how it tastes in Italy. Viva L’Italia is an exception to the rule. When you eat at Viva L’Italia you might forget you’re in Windsor and think you’re in Rome. Viva L’Italia is a family run business and the staff make you feel at home the moment you enter the restaurant. For starters select one of the various pizza breads. The pizza bread is the size of a personal pizza and baked to perfection. Fans of pasta need to order the spaghetti alla Bolognese. The Bolognese is a homemade recipe that takes up to eight hours to prepare, but arrives at your table after you order it. Another delicious dish is the Penne al pesto alla Genovese. You won’t go wrong with any dish you order. In every mouthful you can tell that the chef uses the freshest ingredients to prepare the dishes.

Spaghetti alla Bolognese at Viva L'Italia - Windsor, England

Spaghetti alla Bolognese at Viva L’Italia

Penne al pesto alla Genovese at Viva L'Italia - Windsor, England

Penne al pesto alla Genovese at Viva L’Italia

 

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Windsor and Eton Dining

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Castle Cod: 51.482139, -0.606466
Chocolate Theatre Cafe Bar: 51.485531, -0.607787
Cote Brasserie: 51.486554, -0.608648
Flaming Cow: 51.486169, -0.608652
Viva L\'Italia: 51.483463, -0.608641
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Castle Cod
Dining in Windsor and Eton
Church Street, Windsor, UK
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Chocolate Theatre Cafe Bar
Dining in Windsor and Eton
The Chocolate Theatre Co Ltd, Thames Street, Windsor, United Kingdom
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Cote Brasserie
Dining in Windsor and Eton
Côte Brasserie - Windsor, High Street, Windsor, United Kingdom
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Flaming Cow
Dining in Windsor and Eton
Flaming Cow, Eton, United Kingdom
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Viva L'Italia
Dining in Windsor and Eton
Viva L'Italia, Thames Street, Windsor, United Kingdom

 

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Visiting Windsor and Eton

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Visitors to Windsor and Eton will find two charming English towns right next to each other. Windsor is famous for Windsor Castle. Windsor’s neighbor Eton is home to a prestigious boys’ boarding school. It is easy to visit both towns as they are within walking distance of one another. In fact, a seven-minute walk separates the two train stations that bring travelers to Windsor and Eton. If traveling from London, Windsor & Eton Central services travelers from London Paddington (via a platform at Slough). Travel between the two stations can take anywhere between 27-49 minutes depending on which train you catch. Travelers from London Waterloo will arrive at Windsor & Eton Riverside in one hour. Windsor & Eton Central is the train station closest to Windsor Castle, while Windsor & Eton Riverside is closer to the River Thames and Eton. Listed below are the main sights to visit in Windsor and Eton.

Windsor Royal Shopping

Upon exiting the train at Windsor & Eton Central you walk into the open air Windsor Royal Shopping center. The center was once a Victorian railway station and parts of the original architecture remains. A variety of shops and restaurants are at your disposal to cure your hunger or shopping pangs. If you are hungry and aren’t able to decide which restaurant to eat at try the Cinnamon Cafe. The Cinnamon Cafe serves pastries such as scones and other traditional English foods such as jacket potatoes. In addition to restaurants and clothing stores, Windsor Royal Shopping has candy and souvenir shops. Even more stores are found in the streets surrounding Windsor Royal Shopping. Both established English retailers and international brands are there to fulfill your shopping needs.

Windsor Royal Shopping - Windsor, England

Windsor Royal Shopping

Windsor Castle

The highlight of Windsor is Windsor Castle, one of the residences of the Royal Family. When the Royal Standard flag is flying above the Castle the Queen is home. If the British (Union) flag is on display the Queen is spending her time elsewhere. As Windsor is located near London many tourists flock to Windsor Castle via tour groups. If traveling without a group when you arrive at the Castle you may see a long line of people snaking along the street leading up to the ticket booth entrance. That long line is for tour groups and if you aren’t connected to a group you may go ahead to the ticket booth entrance. A Windsor Castle attendant will guide you to the line for non-tour group visitors. Admission to Windsor Castle includes a handheld device with a self-guided multimedia tour. Your ticket gives you access to the State Apartments, Queen Mary’s Dolls’ House, and St. George’s Chapel. Keep in mind that St. George’s Chapel is closed to tourists Sundays. If you plan on watching Changing the Guard be sure to check on the Windsor Castle website beforehand for up-to-date times.

Windsor Castle - Windsor, England

Windsor Castle’s Round Tower

Windsor Great Park

The easiest way to gain access to Windsor Great Park is by walking to the end of Park Street. There you will find the Park Street Gate. The Park Street Gate is closed during the nighttime but when open it allows you direct access to the Long Walk. The Long Walk is a three-mile tree-lined path through a section of Windsor Great Park. With Windsor Great Park stretching over 8 square miles of land, the Long Walk provides just a glimpse of the grounds. A view of a statue of George III rewards those who traverse the entire path. If the walking made you tired go to the pub right next to the Park Street Gate where you can grab yourself refreshment and recuperate.

Park Street Gate and Windsor Castle - Windsor, England

Park Street Gate (to the left) and Windsor Castle (center)

The Long Walk, Windsor Great Park - Windsor, England

The Long Walk, Windsor Great Park

River Thames and Eton

The River Thames separates the two towns of Windsor and Eton. Walk along the river to see swans frolicking in the water. You can watch rowing and motorboats sail the river. The river flows past the Alexandra Gardens. The gardens are open to visitors and are next to a parking lot if you drive to Windsor and need a spot to leave your car. Besides walking next to the river, several companies offer various boat trips along the river. You can cross over the River Thames by way of the Windsor & Eton Bridge, which connects the two towns of Windsor and Eton. At night Windsor Castle is lit up and the bridge provides a spectacular view. Across the bridge, on the Eton side, are several restaurants of which a few offer riverside seating. If you continue past the restaurants you will wind up on High Street. This street is lined with shops and leads you to Eton College, a boys’ boarding school. The architecture of the shops, restaurants, and boarding school are worth the stroll through the town of Eton.

River Thames - Windsor and Eton, England

River Thames and the Windsor & Eton Bridge

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Windsor and Eton Sights

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Windsor Royal Shopping: 51.482834, -0.609454
Windsor Castle: 51.483889, -0.604408
Windsor Great Park: 51.463062, -0.606337
Eton College: 51.495735, -0.604440
Alexandra Gardens: 51.484611, -0.613870
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Windsor Royal Shopping
Visiting Windsor and Eton
Windsor Royal Shopping, Goswell Hill, Windsor, United Kingdom
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Windsor Castle
Visiting Windsor and Eton
Windsor Castle, Windsor, United Kingdom
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Windsor Great Park
Visiting Windsor and Eton
The Long Walk, Windsor, United Kingdom
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Eton College
Visiting Windsor and Eton
Eton College, Windsor, United Kingdom
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Alexandra Gardens
Visiting Windsor and Eton
Alexandra Gardens, Windsor, United Kingdom

 

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Day Trips From London

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A week in London means a packed itinerary and a day trip to another town may be the furthest thing from your mind. Even so, you should devote a day to a city besides London. Visit other parts of England near London to allow yourself the opportunity to explore another side of the country. Day trips that offer a different experience than staying in London are Bath, Oxford, Reading, Stonehenge, and Windsor. Travel times listed in each heading are one-way train trips from London’s Paddington Station.

Bath – 90 minutes

Walk around London and you can’t imagine that Britain was once part of the Roman Empire. Travel to Bath and that evidence hits you smack dab in the face. The town of Bath is known for its hot springs and the Romans built bathhouses to harness the restorative water. Tourists can buy tickets for admittance into what was once a functioning bathhouse and learn the history of the town. Unlike hot spring locations in other parts of the world, Bath does not have public bathhouses open to visitors. Thermae Spa is the only place in Bath where you can pay to take a dip in water flowing from the hot springs. Before heading home stroll through Bath and admire the Roman architecture and quaint streets.

The Abbey Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul - Bath, England

The Abbey Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul – Bath

Oxford – 60 minutes

Tourists looking to explore England’s famed university towns choose between Oxford and Cambridge. Both are solid choices but Cambridge is a two-hour journey from London while Oxford takes an hour to reach by train. Oxford boasts over 30 different universities within walking distance. Just by being in Oxford one feels smarter as if intelligence is increased by osmosis. You will have the urge to duck into a library to crack open a book and study. When you arrive at the Oxford train station stop by the tourist information booth and buy the 2£ map that includes a walking tour. The walking tour will guide you past the top sites. Plan on the walk to take an hour to complete. The walk will take longer if you walk at a relaxed pace, explore the universities, and eat at one of the many restaurants in Oxford.

The Radcliffe Camera - Oxford University, England

The Radcliffe Camera – Oxford University

Reading – 30 minutes

Reading is not a town brimming with sites, but that’s the appeal. The streets from the train station lead you past various shops and to the Oracle shopping center. The Oracle provides a chance to shop in a mall without the same crowds that you find in London. Behind the Oracle is a riverfront reminiscent of a scaled version of the River Walk in San Antonio, Texas. Plenty of restaurant options around the river will replenish you during your shopping excursion. If you need a pause from the hustle and bustle of London consider Reading that break.

The Oracle Riverside - Reading, England

Reading – The Oracle Riverside

Stonehenge – 3 hours

Photos of the monument Stonehenge are recognizable around the world. Years ago tourists to the fabled grounds of Stonehenge could walk right up to the massive stones and place their hands directly onto the monument. Even though the experience of touching the stones is no longer allowed this prehistoric monument is a site to be seen. With a six hour round trip, this destination is the longest on this list to reach by train. The better plan is to tack Stonehenge along with another location such as Bath. Companies, such as Gray Line, have a bus tour that is nine hours and includes transportation to both Bath and Stonehenge. Travel with a tour group means that you will be on a schedule when at each location. At least you will visit both sites without having to spend six hours sitting on a train.

Stonehenge - Wiltshire, England

Stonehenge

Windsor – 35 minutes

The highlight of Windsor is Windsor Castle, one of the many residences of the Royal Family. If you see the Royal Standard flag flying above the Castle then you know the Queen is home. Tourists primarily descend upon Windsor by tour bus just to visit the Castle. Windsor is more than just the Castle and worth a few extra hours beyond the tour of the Castle grounds. If you arrive at Windsor & Eton Central railway station upon exiting the train are various shops and restaurants. Around Windsor Castle are more shops and restaurants. Next to Windsor Castle is Windsor Great Park that includes pathways such as the Long Walk. Another nice walk is across the River Thames to Eton College, a boys’ boarding school. The streets leading to Eton College are lined with shops and restaurants.

Windsor Castle - Windsor, England

Windsor Castle

 

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Day Trips From London

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Bath: 51.375801, -2.359904
Oxford: 51.752021, -1.257726
Reading: 51.454265, -0.978130
Stonehenge: 51.178882, -1.826215
Windsor: 51.481728, -0.613576
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Bath
Day Trips From London
Bath, United Kingdom
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Oxford
Day Trips From London
Oxford, United Kingdom
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Reading
Day Trips From London
Reading, United Kingdom
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Stonehenge
Day Trips From London
Stonehenge, Amesbury, United Kingdom
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Windsor
Day Trips From London
Windsor, United Kingdom

 

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Transportation Options in London

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A trip to London is expensive for a variety of reasons. Americans who travel to London will have a currency conversion rate that won’t be in their favor. As of November 2015 on average 1 British Pound equaled 1.50 US Dollars. The cost of the airline ticket runs high since flying into and out of London includes a slew of various taxes and fees. Your hotel and meals will be a big part of your budget. The need to pay for ground transportation on top of everything else is daunting. Fortunately, it is possible to save money when it comes to transportation.

From London Heathrow Airport

Heathrow Express is one of the cheapest and fastest ways to get from Heathrow Airport into London. The Heathrow Express is a train that you board from terminals 2, 3, 4, or 5. Trains leave four times an hour. Depending on which terminal you board the train at it takes between 15 to 20 minutes to reach the London Paddington Station. From London Paddington Station you can connect to other parts of the city using London’s other means of transportation, such as the Underground. You buy tickets for the Heathrow Express online or at the station’s ticket office.

Heathrow Connect is a popular means of transportation for employees of Heathrow Airport because of its stops in nearby suburban districts. Heathrow Connect is a slower train alternative to the Heathrow Express, but it is useful for tourists. If you are not traveling into London but need rail connections to other parts of England then you might need to use Heathrow Connect. For example, you can buy your ticket at the ticket office and take Heathrow Connect one stop to the Hayes & Harlington Station. From there you can find a connecting train to Slough or any other train station that has multiple connections that can whisk you away to your destination.

Paddington Underground Station - London, England

London Underground

The London Underground, nicknamed the Tube, is an inexpensive and quick way to navigate London. Tickets available to ride the Tube include single ride tickets, day passes, multi-day passes, and a pay-as-you-go card. Two factors will help you decide which ticket to buy. The number of days you plan on staying in London and where in London you will be traveling. London is separated into various zones, the number of zones you cross using the Underground will help you decide which ticket you need to buy.

To save money you will want to buy either the Travel Card or the Oyster Card. The Travel Card is a paper ticket that can be used within the center zones of London for a set number of days. A seven-day Travel Card exists but is not available to buy in London and must be purchased before your trip. The Oyster Card is a plastic card that can be used in most zones. An Oyster Card has a balance that is deducted as you travel. A benefit of the Oyster Card is that it has a travel cap limit each day. This means once you’ve reached that limit any other journeys on that day are free. For that reason alone if your plans include many trips on the Tube you will want to buy the Oyster Card.

Transport for London is a UK government website with a plethora of information, including information on the various ticket buying options. Visit Britain, the “official shop of the British Tourist Board” has a page on their website with advice on which transportation ticket you should buy when in London. You can buy your tickets online through Visit Britain, including the aforementioned seven-day Travel Card.

Shard and Underground - London, England

Shard and Underground

Other London Transportation

The iconic taxis you can find throughout London are ready to take you to your destination. Each taxi driver must pass an intense exam to become licensed. The taxi drivers have memorized London’s streets and can navigate with ease without needing a GPS device. Besides taxis London has an extensive affordable public bus system. Additionally, various companies offer Hop on Hop off bus tours for a fee. Gray Line is a company that sells Hop on Hop off bus tours, specific tours of London, and day trips from London.

Taxis in front of Buckingham Palace - London, England

Taxis in front of Buckingham Palace

Destinations Beyond London

If your travels will take you elsewhere besides London you will want to consider purchasing a rail pass. It is pricey to buy just one-way point-to-point train tickets for multiple trips. With the right rail pass you can save money. BritRail Passes are not available to buy in Great Britain so you will want to be sure to buy them before your trip. Which pass to buy will depend on where you will be traveling. For example, if you will travel to popular tourist destinations such as Bath or Oxford then you will want to buy the BritRail South West Pass. If you plan on traveling through out Great Britain the best pass will be the BritRail GB Pass. Rail passes are bought for a specified number of days, used either on consecutive days or over a set number of days. The Visit Britain site has a visual breakdown of which destinations each BritRail Pass services. Besides Visit Britain, Rail Europe is another site with information on the various BritRail Passes available. You can buy the BritRail Pass through Visit Britain or through Rail Europe. During checkout the companies will ask what your departure date is to make sure that you will receive your tickets before your trip. Before boarding your first train be sure to visit a train ticket office to have your pass activated.

First Great Western train - England

First Great Western – one of the train companies operating in England

 

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London Cuisine Scene

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Through the years England’s cuisine has earned a reputation. The belief was that English food was bland and boring. It is possible that centuries ago English food was tasteless and why to this day people still believe this. Contrary to that notion today’s London has a booming dining scene just as any other major international city. London is home to a variety of different and exciting cuisines. You can eat well regardless of your budget with delicious food accessible through out the city. There are plenty of choices beyond just the traditional pubs to find a good meal. For those struggling to decide between the various dining options the selections listed below showcase a few of the many sides of flavor available in London.

Borough Market

Borough Market Information - London, EnglandIf you are looking to sample a variety of different foods you will want to visit Borough Market. The site of the current Borough Market has had a market there since as far back as the 13th century. The current iteration dates back to 1756. Although Borough Market has existed for a while, a few decades ago it was not even being mentioned in most guidebooks. It wasn’t until recently that Borough Market has become a worthy stop for travelers and foodies. An outdoor location, located under railway lines and beside a church, makes Borough Market an excellent informal eating experience.

There are plenty of options for a quick bite to eat, especially Monday through Wednesday when the market is open for lunch. One such place is Balkan Bites, which serves bourekas, a crispy baked pastry made with fillings such as potato and onion or spinach and cheese.   Another place for a quick quality meal is Le Marché du Quartier which serves succulent duck confit in either a sandwich, wrap, or salad. If you’re looking for a place with seating visit Fish! Kitchen for their traditional fish and chips. For dessert stop by Whirld for a delicious piece of handmade fudge.

Balkan Bites Bourekas at Borough Market - London, England

Balkan Bites Bourekas

Le Marché du Quartier's duck confit sandwich at Borough Market

Le Marché du Quartier’s duck confit sandwich

Dishoom

Dishoom - London, England

Various dishes available at Dishoom - London, England

Various dishes available at Dishoom

Dishoom likens its decor and style of food to that of a Bombay Cafe. To be honest upon first stepping into Dishoom the decor is more reminiscent of a New York diner. Except instead of sandwiches Dishoom cooks up a variety of Indian dishes. Each dish is prepared with an exquisite attention to detail and the correct balance of flavors. For an appetizer try the Keema Pau, a mix of lamb and peas you slather on top of a buttered roll. Fans of butter chicken from traditional Indian restaurants will want to order Dishoom’s Chicken Ruby. The Gunpowder Potatoes won’t shoot your taste buds but they will melt in your mouth. Add a side order of roti or naan to complete your meal. For those with dietary restrictions Dishoom’s menu includes dairy-free and gluten-free dining options and a children’s menu.

Rock and Sole Plaice

Fish and Chips at Rock and Sole Plaice - London, EnglandWhen visiting England one must have a traditional meal of fish and chips. Rock and Sole Plaice is one of the oldest and best fish and chips restaurants in London. In the Covent Garden district, Rock and Sole Plaice has been serving up fish and chips to locals and tourists since 1871. Rock and Sole Plaice is informal dining and great for families, groups, and anyone who wants to eat quality fish and chips not served on newspaper. Rock and Sole Plaice has two floors of seating which allow for plenty of room for every customer. The restaurants aquatic vibe extends to the walls, which have drawings of the various creatures living under the sea. A few different fish are available to choose from when ordering the fish and chips, including cod and haddock. Whichever fish you select know that it will arrive cooked to perfection. The batter on the fish isn’t doughy, but light and crispy. A side of chips, better known as fries, accompanies the fish. A variety of condiments are available to enhance your fish and chips meal.

 

The Tea House

The Tea House - London, EnglandEngland is synonymous with tea and a great souvenir for those back home is English tea. The problem is that many tourist shops will sell overly priced generic teas to unsuspecting tourists. An alternative to tourist tea is to visit The Tea House. The Tea House is in the district of Covent Garden. The moment you walk through the doors a sense of peace washes over you. You no longer hear the noise from the street outside and the tranquility allows your nose to pick up the various aromas wafting towards you. Take your time and peruse the many teas available to choose from on the shelves. There are jars with loose tea for you to sniff to help you with your choice. The teas can be bought in small or large quantities. Buy tea for yourself so when you are back home you can brew a cup and find yourself transported back to the tranquil feeling that is The Tea House.

 

 

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London Cuisine Scene

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Borough Market: 51.505446, -0.091080
Dishoom: 51.512430, -0.126909
Rock and Sole Plaice: 51.514820, -0.125177
The Tea House: 51.513648, -0.124741
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Borough Market
London Cuisine Scene
Borough Market, London Borough of Southwark, United Kingdom
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Dishoom
London Cuisine Scene
Dishoom, Upper St Martin's Lane, London, United Kingdom
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Rock and Sole Plaice
London Cuisine Scene
Rock & Sole Plaice, Endell Street, London, United Kingdom
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The Tea House
London Cuisine Scene
THE TEAHOUSE, Neal Street, Covent Garden, London, United Kingdom

 

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Sightseeing in London

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In the course of my travels the first international city I could envision myself living in was London, England. I initially selected London as a destination to visit most likely for the same reasons many Americans do. There is an immediate sense of familiarity. Part of the roots of America can be traced to those same English streets. Several buildings and streets remind you of American cities such as Boston. Although they say loo instead of toilet, no language barrier needs to be overcome. The biggest hurdle to American’s visiting London is that cars drive on the other side of the road. Even that isn’t a big issue as they’ve written on the pavement which way to look to cross the street. A trip to London is a good gateway to further international travel.

Deciding on traveling to London is the easy part. The difficult part is deciding which sites to visit if you will be in London only a few days. An entire paragraph can be written just listing out the sites to visit. Any trip to London has to include a plan of action. After a couple visits to London my goal with this article is try to simplify the sightseeing landscape. I hope that the suggestions I’ve written below will help you decide what to do during your trip to London.

The London Eye

London Eye - London, England

If you’re looking to take aerial photos of London your top three choices are the London Eye, The Shard, or St. Paul’s Cathedral. If your time is limited my suggestion is to choose the London Eye. St. Paul’s requires climbing a narrow staircase while The Shard’s entrance price is the most expensive of the three choices. The London Eye is a Ferris wheel that provides aerial photos of The Palace of Westminster. The Parliament buildings, which include Elizabeth Tower and the “Big Ben” bell, are one of the most recognizable sites in the world. For photos it’s impossible to capture the entire building from street level since the buildings are just too big. Since the London Eye is just across the river it allows you the opportunity for that photo you crave. The risk of rain in London is always high, but within a London Eye capsule even your rain soaked photos come out beautiful. If you’re scared of heights an alternative for a photo that captures The Palace of Westminster is on a cruise on the River Thames.

Views From London Eye - London, England

View from a London Eye capsule. The photo on the left side was taken when it wasn’t raining, the photo on the right side was taken when it was raining.

The Theater

A visit to the theater in London makes for an enjoyable afternoon or evening. For historian buffs a good choice is Shakespeare’s Globe. The building is a replica of the original Globe that premiered many of Shakespeare’s works. The current Globe allows one to watch a Shakespeare play just as it was centuries ago. Another choice besides the Globe is The West End, home to world-class play productions. With runs of popular musicals and dramas it can be difficult choosing which one to see. Agatha Christie’s The Mousetrap is a solid choice. The Mousetrap’s first performance was in 1952 and ever since it has continued to be performed. The Mousetrap is the longest running play in the world. When you watch the actors in The Mousetrap you become a part of that history.

Agatha Christie's The Mousetrap at St. Martin's Theatre - London, England

Abbey Road

Even if you’re not a Beatles fan chances are you’ve seen their famous Abbey Road album cover. The fab four stride with confidence through the crosswalk. Many Beatles fans enjoy traveling to London to reenact the album cover. To those who have never been to London the album cover’s crosswalk looks unique. One of the sobering moments upon arriving in London is that other crosswalks look the same as Abbey Road. In fact, making the trek out to Abbey Road can be disappointing for many people. For starters it’s a thirty-minute journey from the center of London (Trafalgar Square). The actual Abbey Road crosswalk looks the same as the surrounding crosswalks. What makes Abbey Road different is a ton of graffiti on the walls of the nearby recording studio and on the Abbey Road street sign. With nothing else of note in the region one could recreate the album cover anywhere in London and get the same effect in a photo. If you are pressed for time and not a die-hard Beatles fan you could skip visiting the actual Abbey Road.

Abbey Road - London, England

The real Abbey Road.

10 Downing Street

10 Downing Street is where the British Prime Minister lives. Similar to the White House in Washington, DC the building is gated, has a ton of security, and your chances of seeing a political figure are slim to none. Unlike the White House one cannot stand in front of 10 Downing Street. The government building is on a narrow street blocked off from pedestrian access. There is no lawn in front from which you can view it yards away. The clearest view you have is that of a crowd of tourists trying to peek through the gated bars to see something of note. If a crowd of tourists sounds fun then hail a black cab and head to 10 Downing Street. If you don’t enjoy crowds you should have no hesitation in avoiding this site.

Downing Street - London, England

The only view tourists get of 10 Downing Street.

Harrods

If you love shopping then visiting Harrods is more than a must it’s a life calling. Even if you are someone who doesn’t enjoy shopping a quick visit to Harrods is an essential part of visiting London. The department store is humongous and you can shop for a variety of products within its walls. You can buy clothes, books, electronics, toys, jewelry, and food. A large department store means you can lose track of time and unintentionally spend hours there. In fact, like a casino in Las Vegas, finding an exit in Harrods is difficult. It’s as though the people behind Harrods want you to spend as much time as possible in their building. The longer you stay the higher the chances are you’ll find something to buy. To maximize your time as you enter Harrods be sure to pick up one of their maps. The map will help you find an exit and locate the departments and merchandise you are most interested in exploring.

Harrods - London, England

 

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Sightseeing in London

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London Eye: 51.503324, -0.119543
The Shard: 51.504382, -0.086279
St Paul\'s Cathedral: 51.513845, -0.098351
Palace of Westminster: 51.499480, -0.124809
Shakespeare\'s Globe: 51.508076, -0.097194
Agatha Christie’s The Mousetrap: 51.512858, -0.127646
Abbey Road: 51.536791, -0.183003
10 Downing Street: 51.503364, -0.127625
Harrods: 51.499405, -0.163234
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London Eye
Sightseeing in London
London Eye, London, United Kingdom
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The Shard
Sightseeing in London
The Shard, London Borough of Southwark, United Kingdom
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St Paul's Cathedral
Sightseeing in London
St. Paul's Cathedral, London, United Kingdom
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Palace of Westminster
Sightseeing in London
Palace of Westminster, London, United Kingdom
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Shakespeare's Globe
Sightseeing in London
Shakespeare's Globe, New Globe Walk, London, United Kingdom
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Agatha Christie’s The Mousetrap
Sightseeing in London
St. Martin's Theatre, West Street, London, United Kingdom
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Abbey Road
Sightseeing in London
Abbey Road, London, United Kingdom
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10 Downing Street
Sightseeing in London
10 Downing Street, Downing Street, London, United Kingdom
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Harrods
Sightseeing in London
Harrods, Brompton Road, London, United Kingdom

 

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