Visiting Picturesque Miyajima Island

Share This:Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someonePrint this page

Miyajima Island has long been a draw for tourists and locals alike for its serenity, nature, and shrines.  Visitors are consistent in voting Miyajima Island one of the top scenic spots in Japan. A quick look on a map and you’ll find that Miyajima’s actual name is Itsukushima.  In Japanese Miyajima means Shrine Island, and the nickname has stuck. With easy access by boat, Miyajima Island makes for a perfect day trip when visiting nearby Hiroshima.

Sunset on Miyajima Island - Itsukushima, Japan

Sunset on Miyajima Island

Traveling to Miyajima Island

You’ll find Miyajima Island in Hiroshima Bay.  Travelers visiting Hiroshima can add an extra day in the region to visit Miyajima Island.  It is easy to reach Miyajima Island from Hiroshima.  The trip is less than an hour and makes for a perfect day trip.  Visitors will reach Miyajima Island from Hiroshima by train and boat.

To reach Miyajima Island most visitors in Hiroshima will board the JR Sanyo Line to Miyajimaguchi Station.  The JR Line is the fastest way to reach Miyajimaguchi Station.  The popular Japan Rail Pass that many tourists use to travel around Japan covers the JR Sanyo Line.  Those that did not buy a Japan Rail Pass have two options to reach Miyajimaguchi Station.  The fastest route is to buy a round trip ticket for the aforementioned JR Sanyo Line.  The cheaper, and slower, alternative is to take the Number 2 Tram Line from central Hiroshima bound for Miyajimaguchi.

Upon reaching Miyajimaguchi Station follow the signs to the Miyajimaguchi/Miyajima Ferry Port.  This short walk leads you to the boats sailing to Miyajima Island.  At the Port, Japan Rail Pass holders may use the entrance marked JR and board the next available boat bound for Miyajima Island.  Those without a Japan Rail Pass will need to buy tickets at the nearby kiosk for the next available sailing.

Travelers without a Japan Rail Pass can reach Miyajima Island without boarding a train.  Two other docks, at Hiroshima Peace Park and Hiroshima Port, offer direct boat rides between Hiroshima and Miyajima Island.

Arriving at Miyajima Island

Regardless of which boat you take to reach Miyajima Island you will disembark at Miyajima Pier.  From the Pier turn right and walk along the path next to the waterfront.  As you walk along the path, and throughout Miyajima Island, you may come upon deer roaming free.  These deer appear tame and comfortable around humans, as long you do not bother them.  Visitors enjoy taking photos with the deer, but be sure to treat the animals with care.  Remember, the deer are wildlife.  Approach the deer with caution, stay at a safe distance, and do not touch or feed the deer.  The deer will eat paper tourists are holding in their hands.  Be mindful if you are holding maps or brochures near the deer.

To the left of the waterfront pathway you will find local owned businesses on the streets of Omotesando and Machiya.  Miyajima artisans are fond of using wood to create everything from trays to containers.  You can even find pieces of woodwork with etchings of various Miyajima sights.  Rice scoopers are one popular item the wood makers craft.  As you walk among the stores keep an eye out for a display featuring the largest rice scooper in the world.

Itsukushima Shinto Shrine

At the end of the streets with stores and restaurants you will come upon Itsukushima Shinto Shrine.  The Shrine’s buildings, along with the nearby Five-Storied Pagoda and O-Torii, have the honorable designation of being a UNESCO World Cultural Site.  Most visitors are familiar with Miyajima Island because of the O-Torii, or Grand Torii Gate.  The O-Torii is first visible from the boat one takes to reach Miyajima Island.

Viewing the O-Torii is a different experience depending on whether you visit during low tide or during high tide.  Upon disembarking from the boat that brought you to Miyajima Island visit the nearby Information Booth for a posted sign with times for low and high tide.  Pre-planners can find tide times posted online if you need to know the times before your visit.  High tide is the perfect time for photos as the O-Torii sits surrounded by water.  Low tide offers visitors the chance to see the O-Torii up close as you may walk up to the Gate.  The ground is wet, muddy, and slippery, so wear proper shoes for the walk to the O-Torii during low tide.

Mt. Misen (the Sacred Mountain) and Observatory

Included in the World Heritage designation is Mt. Misen, known as the Sacred Mountain.  The landscape of the Island has drawn many spiritual beings to Miyajima.  As you hike Mt. Misen, you will find large rocks and trees amidst temples and religious statues.  To hike any part of Mt. Misen requires being in good physical health.  It is possible to hike from the base of Mt. Misen to the top.  Most visitors will ride the Miyajima Ropeway, which will allow you to bypass a large part of Mt. Misen.  From the waterfront follow the signs to the Momijidani Station and use the Ropeway to reach either Kayatani or Shishiiwa Station.

Even taking the Ropeway to the furthest point, Shishiiwa, still leaves hikers with a strenuous trail to the top most observation deck.  The reward in reaching the observation deck is stunning views of Seto Inland Sea and the surrounding Islands.

 

Daishoin Temple

With its deep connection between nature and spirituality, Miyajima is home to many temples.  One in particular, Daishoin Temple, is one of the grandest on Miyajima Island.  The grounds for Daishoin Temple makes it one of the larger temples to explore on Miyajima Island.  The easiest way to locate Daishoin is if you position yourself with the Miyajima Ropeway behind you, and the O-Torii Gate in front of you.  At that point turn left to reach Daishoin.  Take your time walking and admiring the serene grounds, various halls, and thousands of religious statues.

KML-LogoFullscreen-LogoQR-code-logoGeoJSON-LogoGeoRSS-LogoWikitude-Logo
Miyajima Island

loading map - please wait...

Miyajima Pier: 34.302092, 132.322270
Omotesando Street: 34.299070, 132.321860
Machiya Street: 34.298441, 132.322490
Itsukushima Shinto Shrine: 34.296083, 132.319915
Five-Storied Pagoda : 34.297129, 132.320752
O-Torii Gate: 34.297253, 132.318134
Miyajima Ropeway: Momijidani Station: 34.293247, 132.326782
Mt. Misen Observatory: 34.279436, 132.319529
Daishoin Temple: 34.291864, 132.318628
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Miyajima Pier
Visiting Picturesque Miyajima Island
Miyajima, Japan
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Omotesando Street
Visiting Picturesque Miyajima Island
Miyajima, Japan
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Machiya Street
Visiting Picturesque Miyajima Island
Miyajima, Japan
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Itsukushima Shinto Shrine
Visiting Picturesque Miyajima Island
Itsukushima Island 広島県, Japan
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Five-Storied Pagoda
Visiting Picturesque Miyajima Island
Miyajima, Japan
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
O-Torii Gate
Visiting Picturesque Miyajima Island
Miyajima, Japan
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Miyajima Ropeway: Momijidani Station
Visiting Picturesque Miyajima Island
Miyajima, Japan
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Mt. Misen Observatory
Visiting Picturesque Miyajima Island
Miyajima, Japan
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Daishoin Temple
Visiting Picturesque Miyajima Island
Miyajima, Japan

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Share This:Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someonePrint this page

Kinosaki: A Hot Spring Town in Japan

Share This:Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someonePrint this page

Kinosaki Onsen, or Kinosaki for short, is a popular destination for tourists and people living in Japan.  The town’s various onsen, hot spring baths, account for Kinosaki’s reputation as a top destination.  Most visitors flock to Kinosaki for the chance to relax in the warm and restorative hot spring water.  Besides the onsen people will find a quaint town full of charm.

Manhole Cover - Kinosaki, Japan

Manhole cover in Kinosaki

Train Station - Kinosaki, Japan

Kinosaki Train Station

Arrival in Kinosaki

Accessible by train, tourists reach Kinosaki via Japan Rail from Kyoto or Osaka within three hours.  Tourists spending the night will stay either at a hotel or a ryokan, a traditional Japanese inn.  Upon arrival at the Kinosaki train station, tourists with lots of luggage and reservations at a hotel or ryokan should stop at the nearby Hotel/Ryokan Information Center.  Located across from the train station, you can use the Center’s luggage check service.  For 50 yen per piece of luggage, the Center will send the luggage direct to your hotel or ryokan.  This will free you from the constraints of your baggage and allow you your first opportunity to explore Kinosaki on foot.

Street in Kinosaki, Japan

Street in Kinosaki

Restaurant serving crab, a local specialty of Kinosaki, Japan

Restaurant serving crab, a local specialty of Kinosaki

The Town of Kinosaki

Kinosaki has few cars, making it ideal for walking.  Upon exiting the train station, notice that buildings reach only a few stories high. You won’t find skyscrapers or subways, but instead a peaceful town where time saunters at a slow pace.  Head west from the Kinosaki Onsen train station to one of the town’s main streets.  Here you will pass by souvenir shops, storefronts, and restaurants.  Those visitors not staying at a ryokan that includes meals should eat at restaurants that serve Kinosaki’s local specialties of crab and beef.  For meat eaters make sure the menu serves the local Tajima beef, the root of the beef known the world over as Kobe beef.

Daytime in Kinosaki, Japan

Daytime in Kinosaki

Night in Kinosaki, Japan

Night in Kinosaki

At the end of this main street, you will reach a river that flows through the town.  Here you can walk along the river, using small bridges to reach both sides of the street.  Sprinkled throughout the town you will find various temples.  From the temples, to the buildings, the river and bridges, makes Kinosaki charming whether it be day or night, sunny or rainy.

Onsen – Japanese Bathhouses

As you walk around Kinosaki, you will see visitors wearing yukata.  Yukata are light, casual, versions of kimonos, the traditional Japanese garment.  Those wearing yukata are most likely heading to a bathhouse, known as onsen.  The yukata allows for quick changing while at the onsen.  Kinosaki has seven public onsen.  Those staying at either a hotel or ryokan should receive free passes that allows access to each of the seven public onsen.  Anyone visiting Kinosaki for the day may pay an entrance fee to access a particular public onsen.  If you prefer a more private bathing experience check with the various ryokan in town.  A few ryokans may offer, with a reservation fee, private hot spring rooms.

Bathing in an Onsen

Anyone new to using Japanese onsen will want to know the rules associated with visiting a hot spring bathhouse.  Public onsen have separate bathing facilities for men and women.  You will bath without clothing, not even a swimsuit.  When you arrive at an onsen use the provided lockers to disrobe and to store your clothing and belongings.  Before entering the hot spring, rinse yourself with the showering stations set along the wall.

At the shower station, wash yourself with the provided soap and shampoo.  Rinse the soap and shampoo off before entering the hot spring.  This way you are clean when you enter the bath and no soap or shampoo chemicals will get into the hot spring water.  Place the small towel provided by the onsen either on your head or beside the bath.  Do not put the towel or your locker key in the water.  Nothing but your skin should enter the hot spring or touch the water.  Once in the hot spring sit back and relax in the natural waters.

Hot Springs Alternatives

Kinosaki’s hot spring water isn’t found just inside the onsen.  In a few locations around the town you will find foot massage pools.  Here you can dip your feet into water pools full of fresh hot spring water.  These spots are a perfect way to rest those tired feet after strolling around town.  Near one particular foot pool is Chaya.  This food stand serves drinks, ice cream, and a unique egg experience.  First, buy a small sack containing three eggs.  Then tie the sack to the wooden plank hovering above a pool of hot spring water.  Leave the eggs in the hot spring water for twelve to thirteen minutes and you’ll have a delicious soft-boiled egg.

Hot spring drinking water - Kinosaki, Japan

Hot spring drinking water stand in Kinosaki

Hot spring drinking water - Kinosaki, Japan

Hot spring drinking water in Kinosaki

Besides foot pools and egg cooking you’ll find around the town hot spring drinking water fountains.  These fountains are not your regular drinking fountains.  You don’t push a button for the water.  Use the provided cups by the fountain to capture the water to drink.  The drinking water is helpful for those suffering from chronic digestive organ problems or chronic constipation.  Be aware though that signs near the fountain will warn you not to consume the water over a long period of time.  The reason being that the water has sodium chloride and calcium chloride.  Infants and those with kidney disease, high blood pressure, or are prone to swelling should not drink the water.

Entrance to Kinosaki Ropeway - Kinosaki, Japan

Entrance to Kinosaki Ropeway

Kinosaki Ropeway gondola cable car - Kinosaki, Japan

Kinosaki Ropeway gondola cable car

Kinosaki Spa Ropeway

Another popular site to visit is the Kinosaki Spa Ropeway, for its panoramic views of Kinosaki.  In total the Ropeway has three stations along a mountain.  The first of these stops is at the foot of the mountain, next to the earlier mentioned food stand Chaya.  Buy tickets for riding the gondola cable cars at the first station.  Those not wanting to ride the Ropeway can use pathways to walk up the mountain.  The pathway is not an easy hike, and it takes up to an hour to reach the top of the mountain.  Taking the gondola cable cars is a much faster way to ascend to the top of the mountain.

Statue found at the mountain top of the Kinosaki Ropeway - Kinosaki, Japan

Statue found at the mountain top of the Kinosaki Ropeway

View from the mountain top of the Kinosaki Ropeway - Kinosaki, Japan

View from the mountain top of the Kinosaki Ropeway

At the second station of the Ropeway you will find the Onsenji Temple and Kinosaki Art Museum.  The top most station of the Ropeway has a viewing platform.  Here you can see Kinosaki, the surrounding town, Maruyama River, and the Sea of Japan.

 

KML-LogoFullscreen-LogoQR-code-logoGeoJSON-LogoGeoRSS-LogoWikitude-Logo
Kinosaki

loading map - please wait...

Jizouyu Bath: 35.626658, 134.812567
Kinosaki Train Station: 35.623680, 134.813460
Goshonoyu Bath: 35.625903, 134.807370
Mandarayu Bath: 35.624462, 134.805707
Satonoyu Bath: 35.624288, 134.813457
Chaya: 35.625585, 134.804290
Kinosaki Spa Ropeway: 35.624004, 134.800590
Yanagiyu Bath: 35.675147, -224.121094
Ichinoyu Bath: 35.626448, 134.810470
Kounoyu Bath: 35.626260, 134.804486
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Jizouyu Bath
Kinosaki: A Hot Spring Town in Japan
Kinosaki Onsen-eki, Japan
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Kinosaki Train Station
Kinosaki: A Hot Spring Town in Japan
Kinosaki Onsen-eki, Japan
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Goshonoyu Bath
Kinosaki: A Hot Spring Town in Japan
御所の湯, Japan
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Mandarayu Bath
Kinosaki: A Hot Spring Town in Japan
まんだら湯, Japan
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Satonoyu Bath
Kinosaki: A Hot Spring Town in Japan
さとの湯, Japan
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Chaya
Kinosaki: A Hot Spring Town in Japan
Kinosaki Onsen-eki, Japan
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Kinosaki Spa Ropeway
Kinosaki: A Hot Spring Town in Japan
城崎温泉ロープウェイ, Japan
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Yanagiyu Bath
Kinosaki: A Hot Spring Town in Japan
Kinosaki Onsen-eki, Japan
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Ichinoyu Bath
Kinosaki: A Hot Spring Town in Japan
一の湯, Japan
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Kounoyu Bath
Kinosaki: A Hot Spring Town in Japan
鴻の湯, Japan

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Share This:Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someonePrint this page

Visiting Whistler with Gray Line Tours

Share This:Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someonePrint this page

During a trip to Vancouver we found ourselves with a day with nothing planned. To fill that day we researched what day trips we could do from Vancouver. We took a look at the map of British Columbia and one city jumped out at us, the iconic ski resort of Whistler. Even though our visit was during the springtime, we knew we still wanted to travel to Whistler.

We didn’t have a rental car and had to explore other options for reaching Whistler. It was our understanding that a train ride in Canada is a great way to see the country’s landscape. As appealing as that sounded a train from Vancouver takes an entire day to reach Whistler and we’d have to spend the night in Whistler. To keep the visit to one day we had only one practical choice, riding a bus service to our destination.

Gray Line Tour Bus - British Columbia, Canada

Gray Line Tour Bus

Gray Line Tours

A few companies offer direct bus service between Vancouver and Whistler but we opted for the tour company Gray Line. Gray Line has a 10-hour tour with stops at Whistler and Shannon Falls. We’d used Gray Line before in other parts of the world and knew how reputable a company they are. By choosing Gray Line we knew we’d have the opportunity to stop at other places besides Whistler and be escorted by a knowledgeable guide.

On the day of our excursion the Gray Line bus arrived at our hotel in the morning. Our driver/tour guide for the day was Jack, a Canadian who’d lived in Vancouver his entire life. After we got on the Gray Line bus Jack continued on to pick up the other tour travelers from their respective hotels. With everyone on board Jack made his way through Downtown Vancouver. Along the way Jack pointed out sights and added historical commentary related to the various regions we passed. At this point in our trip we’d been in Vancouver a few days. The insights provided by Jack added clarity and perspective to the sights and districts we’d seen and visited on the days prior. Once out of Downtown Vancouver the bus made its way to Highway 99, the Sea to Sky Highway, and the main road to Whistler.

Porteau Cove - British Columbia, Canada

Porteau Cove

Howe Sound - Porteau Cove Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada

View of Howe Sound from Porteau Cove Provincial Park

Sea to Sky Highway 99

With traffic being light the morning of our tour our driver/tour guide Jack made extra stops along the way to Whistler. These stops were a pleasant surprise since they did not appear on the original itinerary. The first of these stops was Porteau Cove, a provincial marine park. At Porteau Cove locals can camp by the waterfront or launch boats from the dock. Visitors to Porteau Cove see stunning views of Howe Sound, crystal blue water, and towering green trees.   Those lucky enough to visit Porteau Cove after dark can stargaze on cloudless nights. They might even have the chance at viewing the Aurora Borealis during the right parts of the year.

After Porteau Cove we made our way to our first official itinerary stop, the Squamish Adventure Centre. Those traveling through this region with a rental car will want to stop at the Squamish Adventure Centre. The Visitor Centre has information, brochures, and a booking desk for those looking to partake in outdoor activities. Those interested in the history of the First Nations, Canada’s indigenous people, will find informational exhibits throughout the Centre. In addition, the Squamish Adventure Centre has restrooms, a cafe, and a gift shop.

Squamish Adventure Centre - Squamish, British Columbia, Canada

Squamish Adventure Centre

Alexander Falls - Whistler, British Columbia, Canada

Alexander Falls

Whistler Olympic Park and Alexander Falls

With time still in our favor from the lack of traffic we made an unscheduled detour up a road that leads to the Whistler Olympic Park. The Olympic Park was the location for many of the athletic events for the 2010 Winter Olympics. Close to Olympic Park is a waterfall called Alexander Falls. Our bus parked in a gravel lot with access to a viewing platform. Without having to hike we walked to the platform and had a direct view of the waterfall.

As we walked back to the Gray Line bus one of our travel mates pointed out something the rest of us had missed. In a grove of trees a good distance from the parking lot the tops of massive trees were swaying even though there was no breeze. Our eagle-eyed companion had spotted a black bear and her cub that had climbed up to the top of the tree. Although the bears were a good distance from the bus, we could still see them well enough from our location. To see bears in their natural habitat awed the bus full of city folks and we knew we’d gotten more than our money’s worth for this tour.

Whistler Village - Whistler, British Columbia, Canada

Whistler Village

Hunter’s Bowl at Stonesedge Kitchen - Whistler Village, Whistler, British Columbia, Canada

Hunter’s Bowl at Stonesedge Kitchen

Roast Duck Mac N Cheese at Stonesedge Kitchen - Whistler Village, Whistler, British Columbia, Canada

Roast Duck Mac N Cheese at Stonesedge Kitchen

Whistler Village

From Alexander Falls the Gray Line bus made its way to Whistler Village. The sprawling pedestrian avenues of Whistler Village beckoned us with its stores and restaurants. We’d arrived in Whistler Village at noon and had three hours to ourselves to explore Whistler. Our first order of business was lunch and for that we went to Stonesedge Kitchen. This restaurant prides itself in serving “comfort food” and it did not disappoint. We ordered the Hunter’s Bowl and the Roast Duck Mac N Cheese. The Hunter’s Bowl has venison with rigatoni, mixed in a tomato cream sauce. Besides the dishes we ordered two beers from a local brewery, Whistler Brewing Company. We had the Bear Paw Honey Lager and the Whiskey Jack Ale. The beers paired great with our dishes and we left Stonesedge Kitchen satisfied, renewed, and ready to tackle Whistler Village.

Walk around Whistler Village and you can’t help being smitten with the quaint and charming buildings. Even in springtime the chalet architecture gives you the sense you are in a snowy wonderland. You might think that Whistler Village in the springtime is a ghost town. It turns out the opposite is true as every store and restaurant was open for business with plenty of vacationing folks walking the pedestrian pathways. Even the ski lifts were operational, allowing visitors the chance to reach the top of the mountains for gorgeous views. Plus in the springtime there may still be snow on the top of the mountains and even limited skiing available.

Ski lifts at Whistler Village - Whistler, British Columbia, Canada

Ski lifts at Whistler Village

Rebagliati Park - Whistler Village, Whistler, British Columbia, Canada

Rebagliati Park

Whistler Olympic Plaza

Throughout Whistler Village walkways connect the various hotel properties. These non-strenuous walks take you by roaring streams and tall trees such as those found in Rebagliati Park. Around the various hotels you will find more shops and restaurants. First-time visitors will want to see the Whistler Olympic Plaza. The original use for this location was for the medal ceremonies during the Whistler Olympics. Now people come to Olympic Plaza for concerts, to hangout, relax, and soak in the surrounding views of nature. The Olympic Plaza is home to the Olympic Rings, a perfect photo spot. Near the Olympic Rings are plaques listing each of the 2010 Olympic Winter Games medalists.

Whistler Olympic Plaza - Whistler Village, Whistler, British Columbia, Canada

Whistler Olympic Plaza

Whistler Olympic Rings - Whistler Village, Whistler, British Columbia, Canada

Whistler Olympic Rings

Shannon Falls

After an afternoon in Whistler Village we boarded the Gray Line bus and began the ride back to Vancouver. Along the way, again on the Sea to Sky Highway, we stopped at a scenic viewpoint. Here we had panoramic views of snow-capped mountain ranges and fields of green trees. From the viewpoint the bus took us to the last of the scheduled itinerary stops, Shannon Falls. A short walk from the parking lot led us to a viewing platform where we could gaze at the waterfall. We were fortunate that we undertook this tour in the springtime. The recent winter’s snow had melted off the surrounding mountains. That was why the waterfalls, rivers, and creeks we’d encountered during the day’s trips were full of rushing water. Shannon Falls was no exception, and magnificent to view.

Sea to Sky Highway 99 Viewpoint - British Columbia, Canada

Viewpoint along the Sea to Sky Highway 99

Shannon Falls - British Columbia, Canada

Shannon Falls

From Shannon Falls our driver/tour guide Jack drove us back to Vancouver. Along the way he made one last diversion through West Vancouver, offering us views of local neighborhoods and the skyline of Downtown Vancouver. From West Vancouver Jack deposited travelers back to their respective hotels. Everyone one of us left the tour bus with smiles on our faces. Each of these added stops and detours made our trip to Whistler extra special. On a direct bus we’d have seen just Downtown Vancouver and Whistler Village. If you plan on visiting Vancouver and have a day with nothing planned we recommend you explore Whistler with Gray Line Tours.

View of the skyline of Downtown Vancouver from West Vancouver - Vancouver; British Columbia, Canada

View of the skyline of Downtown Vancouver from West Vancouver

KML-LogoFullscreen-LogoQR-code-logoGeoJSON-LogoGeoRSS-LogoWikitude-Logo
Gray Line Tours - From Vancouver to Whistler

loading map - please wait...

Porteau Cove Provincial Park: 49.557121, -123.236311
Squamish Adventure Centre: 49.707029, -123.145871
Whistler Olympic Park: 50.139143, -123.113705
Alexander Falls: 50.135199, -123.127904
Whistler Village: 50.115743, -122.956334
Stonesedge Kitchen: 50.114190, -122.956994
Rebagliati Park: 50.115830, -122.950342
Whistler Olympic Plaza: 50.118817, -122.954993
Shannon Falls: 49.669969, -123.156460
West Vancouver: 49.334897, -123.166785
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Porteau Cove Provincial Park
Visiting Whistler with Gray Line Tours
Porteau Cove Provincial Park, Squamish-Lillooet D, BC, Canada
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Squamish Adventure Centre
Visiting Whistler with Gray Line Tours
Squamish Adventure Centre, Loggers Lane, Squamish, BC, Canada
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Whistler Olympic Park
Visiting Whistler with Gray Line Tours
Whistler Olympic Park, Callaghan Road, Whistler, BC, Canada
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Alexander Falls
Visiting Whistler with Gray Line Tours
Alexander Falls, Squamish-Lillooet D, British Columbia, Canada
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Whistler Village
Visiting Whistler with Gray Line Tours
Whistler Village, BC, Gate Way Drive, Whistler, BC, Canada
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Stonesedge Kitchen
Visiting Whistler with Gray Line Tours
Stonesedge Kitchen, Whistler, BC, Canada
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Rebagliati Park
Visiting Whistler with Gray Line Tours
Rebagliati Park, Whistler, BC, Canada
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Whistler Olympic Plaza
Visiting Whistler with Gray Line Tours
Whistler Olympic Plaza, Village Stroll, Whistler, BC, Canada
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Shannon Falls
Visiting Whistler with Gray Line Tours
Shannon Falls, Squamish, British Columbia, Canada
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
West Vancouver
Visiting Whistler with Gray Line Tours
West Vancouver, BC, Canada
Share This:Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someonePrint this page

Stanley Park: Vancouver’s Urban Park

Share This:Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someonePrint this page

Next to Vancouver’s West End district lies a massive public space called Stanley Park. Here people commune with nature just minutes from the busy urban city center of Vancouver. Paved paths allow bikers, roller bladders, runners, and walkers the chance to exercise. Fields, picnic areas, and beaches give people a chance to relax in a natural setting. For first timers a visit to Stanley Park is a daunting task, what with over 1,000 acres to explore. It won’t be possible to explore the entire grounds and nothing ruins a vacation more than running out of time. This article will be your guide for spending just a few hours at Stanley Park.

The Stanley Park Bus

Although within walking distance from most of Vancouver’s various districts, save your energy for once you reach Stanley Park. Regardless of where you are starting from in the city the easiest way to reach Stanley Park is by boarding the #19 Bus. The #19 Bus routes through the city on major streets such as Kingsway, Main, Pender, and Georgia. The last two stops on the route headed to Stanley Park are Stanley Park Drive at Pipeline Road and Stanley Park Loop Bay. Although you might be tempted to ride the #19 Bus to either of these stops we recommend getting off at W Georgia and Denman Street. At this stop you’ll be able to catch the start of the Seawall, a pathway that follows along the waterfront.

The Search, a statue near Devonian Harbour Park - Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

The Search, a statue near Devonian Harbour Park

Seaplane at Stanley Park - Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Seaplane at Stanley Park

Stanley Park Trail - Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Stanley Park Trail

From Bus to Seawall

You’ll exit the #19 Bus at W Georgia and Denman Street, and Devonian Harbour Park. You are at the correct stop if you see a statue of a woman searching through her purse. The artist J. Seward Johnson Jr. sculpted this statue. Known as “The Search”, you’ll often find fresh flowers either in the statue’s hair on in the purse. From the statue continue walking on W Georgia Street with the water and Devonian Harbour Park on your right-hand side. At the point where W Georgia Street becomes Lions Gate Bridge Road use the path that heads straight to the water. Continue to the path that runs along the waterfront and use this path to reach the Seawall.

Harry Jerome statue in Stanley Park - Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Harry Jerome statue in Stanley Park

View of Canada Place from Stanley Park - Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

View of Canada Place from Stanley Park

View of Vancouver from Stanley Park trail - Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

View of Vancouver from Stanley Park trail

Stanley Park’s Seawall

Walk along the Seawall to appreciate Stanley Park and Downtown Vancouver at the same time. You’ll pass boats docked in Burrard Inlet, the trees of Stanley Park to your left, and the tall skyscrapers of Vancouver across the waters to your right. These stunning views afford wonderful photo opportunities. As you’re taking your pictures you may even see a seaplane sail overhead and land on the waters in front of you. Continue along the Seawall until you see the statue of a runner. This statue is of Harry Jerome who took part in the 1964 Olympics and won Canada a bronze medal for the 100-meter run. From this statue continue walking until you hit a plaque on the Seawall that is the Port of Vancouver lookout.

At the lookout you will have a photo perfect view of Canada Place, the skyscrapers of Vancouver, and maybe even a cruise ship. From here you will walk to the farthest point of Stanley Park that this guide covers, Brockton Point Lighthouse. Built in 1914, from this Lighthouse you will have a view of Lions Gate Bridge in the distance. After you’ve soaked in the view head back the way you came along the Seawall.

Brockton Point Lighthouse in Stanley Park - Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Brockton Point Lighthouse in Stanley Park

View of Lions Gate Bridge from Stanley Park - Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

View of Lions Gate Bridge from Stanley Park

Totem Poles in Stanley Park - Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Totem Poles in Stanley Park

Totem Poles

As you’re walking back from the Brockton Point Lighthouse make a right at Stanley Park Drive. Follow the signs to the Totem Poles. You will come upon a grove with eight Totem Poles. A nearby plaque illuminates visitors to the fact that the Totem Poles were coat-of-arms for the British Columbia Indians. According to the plaque Totem Poles are only found in British Columbia and Alaska, which makes it well worth your time to visit this grove. From the Totem Poles make your way back to the Seawall and retrace your steps to the #19 Bus stop.

Time Needed for Stanley Park

Google Maps lists the walking time from the #19 Bus Stop, at W Georgia and Denman Street, to the furthest point in this guide, Brockton Point Lighthouse, at 30 minutes. With that in mind, set aside another 30 minutes for the return walk. Add another hour if you plan to walk at a leisurely pace and will stop for photographs. This guide should take you around two hours to complete.

 

KML-LogoFullscreen-LogoQR-code-logoGeoJSON-LogoGeoRSS-LogoWikitude-Logo
Stanley Park

loading map - please wait...

Bus 19 Stop - W Georgia and Denman Street: 49.292903, -123.133972
Pedestrian Path to Seawall: 49.295072, -123.136042
Harry Jerome statue : 49.298137, -123.119166
Port of Vancouver lookout: 49.300201, -123.116398
Brockton Point Lighthouse: 49.300882, -123.117030
Totem Poles: 49.299248, -123.120802
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Bus 19 Stop - W Georgia and Denman Street
Stanley Park: Vancouver’s Urban Park
Devonian Harbour Park, Vancouver, BC, Canada
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Pedestrian Path to Seawall
Stanley Park: Vancouver’s Urban Park
Stanley Park Drive, Vancouver, BC, Canada
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Harry Jerome statue
Stanley Park: Vancouver’s Urban Park
Stanley Park Drive, Vancouver, BC, Canada
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Port of Vancouver lookout
Stanley Park: Vancouver’s Urban Park
Stanley Park Drive, Vancouver, BC, Canada
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Brockton Point Lighthouse
Stanley Park: Vancouver’s Urban Park
Brockton Point Lighthouse, Vancouver, BC, Canada
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Totem Poles
Stanley Park: Vancouver’s Urban Park
Totem Poles, Vancouver, BC, Canada
Share This:Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someonePrint this page

Overview of Vancouver, Canada

Share This:Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someonePrint this page

Ask ten different people what their favorite thing to do in the Canadian city of Vancouver is and you are likely to get ten different answers. The reason you get varied responses stems from the fact that few places in the world compare to Vancouver. To the casual observer Vancouver is just another metropolitan city. Yet Vancouver differs from other major cities because it embodies diversity. In one day visitors can hike Stanley Park in the morning and then shop Downtown among the masses in the afternoon. Foodies buy produce at Granville Island one moment and enjoy fine dining in Yaletown the next. Convention goers attend meetings at Canada Place and then lounge waterside at English Bay Beach. Tourists walk historic Gastown before slurping noodles in Chinatown. These dichotomies exist in harmony with the diverse people of Vancouver.

With something for everyone Vancouver as a tourist destination appeals to even the most discerning of travelers. First time travelers looking at a map of Vancouver might notice that the city looks like an oyster shell. As anyone who loves oysters knows, you’ll want to crack that shell open and dig into what Vancouver offers. Vancouver isn’t a difficult city to navigate but the easiest way to get oriented is to begin somewhat in the middle of the city in the Downtown district. Downtown is home to the financial and business districts of the city. Among the skyscrapers you will find the Vancouver Central Library. This stunning building is an architectural contrast to the stark skyscrapers. In Downtown you’ll want to make your way to Robson Street. This is one of the main thoroughfares in Vancouver and stretches the length of the city.

On one end of Robson Street is BC Place, a stadium where one can catch either a sporting or musical event. Continuing on and around Robson Street you’ll find a variety of shops. A number of the stores are global brands but a few, such as Roots, are Canadian brands. Few tourists will walk the entirety of Robson Street, but those that do wind up at Stanley Park. If you don’t wish to walk, or don’t have a car, you will reach Stanley Park by bus. Stanley Park is a massive public space with paved paths for bicyclists, roller bladders, and walkers. Here visitors enjoy trees, totem poles, and the waters of the Vancouver Harbour.

To the east of Downtown you will find Canada Place. If you arrived by cruise ship, you will have most likely disembarked at this spot. Besides being a cruise ship terminal, Canada Place is home to a convention center and hotel. Near Canada Place is the oldest neighborhood in the city, the historic Gastown. First time tourists visit Gastown at least once, to see the Steam Clock and a chance to shop for souvenirs. Next to Gastown is Canada’s largest Chinatown. Vancouver’s Chinatown traces its history back to 1885 and to this day is full of shops and restaurants. While in Chinatown you will want to visit the Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Classical Chinese Garden. This tranquil spot is a wonderful place to recharge and center oneself.

West of Downtown, in simplest terms, is synonymous with food. The regions of the West End and Yaletown are quintessential foodie neighborhoods. Here you will find well-established diners among up and coming restaurants. Further west, across the waters of False Creek, is Granville Island. Here at the Granville Island Public Market are vendors galore. Visitors can buy fresh produce, straight out of the oven breads and pastries, and a plethora of other food products.

Regardless of how you spend your time in Vancouver you will find navigating the city easy. Those who enjoy walking will find wide avenues and flat surfaces. Bus routes traverse throughout the entire city. Ferries sail to Granville Island or further afield to places such as the city of Victoria. Vancouver’s rapid transit system, SkyTrain, runs through parts of Downtown. The SkyTrain connects Vancouver to the cities of Burnaby, New Westminister, Surrey, and Richmond. For those arriving in Vancouver by airplane, the SkyTrain’s Canada Line will get you from Vancouver International Airport to your destination in no time.

KML-LogoFullscreen-LogoQR-code-logoGeoJSON-LogoGeoRSS-LogoWikitude-Logo
Vancouver

loading map - please wait...

Vancouver Central Library: 49.279754, -123.115679
Robson Street: 49.284605, -123.124824
BC Place: 49.276750, -123.111999
Stanley Park: 49.298319, -123.137684
Canada Place: 49.289124, -123.116498
Gastown: 49.282808, -123.106688
Chinatown: 49.280600, -123.100553
Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Classical Chinese Garden: 49.279649, -123.103913
West End: 49.285646, -123.130621
Yaletown: 49.275702, -123.119907
Granville Island: 49.270622, -123.134741
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Vancouver Central Library
Overview of Vancouver, Canada
Vancouver Public Library- Central Branch, West Georgia Street, Central, Vancouver, BC, Canada
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Robson Street
Overview of Vancouver, Canada
Robson Street, Vancouver, BC, Canada
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
BC Place
Overview of Vancouver, Canada
BC Place, Pacific Boulevard, Vancouver, BC, Canada
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Stanley Park
Overview of Vancouver, Canada
and
Stanley Park: Vancouver’s Urban Park

Stanley Park Drive, Vancouver, BC, Canada
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Canada Place
Overview of Vancouver, Canada
Vancouver Convention Centre West Building, Canada Place, Vancouver, BC, Canada
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Gastown
Overview of Vancouver, Canada
Gastown, Vancouver, BC, Canada
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Chinatown
Overview of Vancouver, Canada
Chinatown, East Pender Street, Vancouver, BC, Canada
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Classical Chinese Garden
Overview of Vancouver, Canada
Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Classical Chinese Garden, Vancouver, BC, Canada
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
West End
Overview of Vancouver, Canada
West End, Vancouver, BC, Canada
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Yaletown
Overview of Vancouver, Canada
Yaletown, Vancouver, BC, Canada
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Granville Island

Overview of Vancouver, Canada
and
Vancouver’s Granville Island


Granville Island, Vancouver, BC, Canada

 

Share This:Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someonePrint this page

Big Island Beaches

Share This:Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someonePrint this page

The beaches on the Big Island of Hawaii are as picturesque and popular as the beaches found in the state’s other islands. Travelers staying on the Kona side of the Big Island have three distinct beaches they should plan to visit. Three Big Island beaches worth soaking up the sun’s rays at are Anaehoʻomalu Bay, Hapuna Beach, and Punalu’u Black Sand Beach Park.

Anaehoʻomalu Bay - Big Island, Hawaii, USA

Anaehoʻomalu Bay

Anaehoʻomalu Bay

Anaehoʻomalu Bay stretches along the west coast of the Big Island. A section of the Bay connects to the Waikoloa Resorts, including the Hilton Waikoloa Village and Waikoloa Beach Marriott Resort and Spa. With portions of Anaehoʻomalu Bay being attached to the Waikoloa Resorts the Bay is often referred to as Waikoloa Beach. The part of Anaehoʻomalu Bay that is closest to the Waikoloa Beach Marriott Resort and Spa includes an inlet of water. Between the inlet and the Pacific Ocean is a stretch of sand for beachgoers to enjoy.   The contrast of the Bay along with the Pacific Ocean and the narrow stretch of sand provides a perfect setting for photos. In fact, the entire Anaehoʻomalu Bay is a great place to view the magical sunsets of Hawaii. Near the beach Anaehoʻomalu Bay has trails that lead through lava rock. Among the lava rock are tide pools and petroglyphs. Any time you see ancient petroglyphs you know you are on sacred land and should not step on those rocks. Enjoy your time at Anaehoʻomalu Bay by strolling through the lava rock trails or relaxing on the beach.

Anaehoʻomalu Bay - Big Island, Hawaii, USA

Anaehoʻomalu Bay

Sunset at Anaehoʻomalu Bay - Big Island, Hawaii, USA

Sunset at Anaehoʻomalu Bay

Hapuna Beach

The Northwest coast of the Big Island is home to the Hapuna Beach State Recreation Area. As one of the few actual white sand Big Island beaches, Hapuna Beach is popular with locals and tourists. The white sand is so soft that beachgoers find it hard to leave Hapuna Beach. Since Hapuna Beach is popular arrive early if you want to claim a spot to lounge on for the duration of the day. Besides sand Hapuna Beach offers picnic tables for those who might bring their own food and wish to eat while watching the Pacific Ocean waves. Although the beach now is only for swimming, sunbathing, and picnicking the beach has an interesting history. The military conducted training sessions on Hapuna Beach during World War II. Even to this day due to these training sessions sometimes pieces of old ordnance, or artillery, will wash up on shore. Warning signs even great visitors to Hapuna Beach alerting them of the possibility of unexploded ordnance. Sweeps for ordnance occur on a routine basis ever since the military ceased training sessions on Hapuna Beach. If in the rare case that you find a piece of ordnance do not touch it. Contact the authorities by calling 911 and let them handle the ordnance.

Hapuna Beach - Big Island, Hawaii, USA

Hapuna Beach

Punalu’u Beach

Punalu’u Black Sand Beach Park is often referred to as Punalu’u Beach or Black Sand Beach. The Punalu’u Beach is on the southern part of the Big Island. Although not on the Kona side of the Big Island the black sand found at this beach make this a worthwhile drive. The drive from central Kona is an hour and forty minutes. Visitors staying in Hilo can reach Punalu’u Beach in an hour and fifteen minutes. Long ago lava flowing into the ocean created the black sand. Around the black sound is lava rock that extends into the ocean. With the lava rock so prominent once you wade into the water you find that the ground is full of rocks. This makes swimming in the Pacific Ocean here a challenge. Besides experiencing the unique black sand, Punalu’u Beach is home to sea turtles. The sea turtles are an endangered species and protected by state and federal law. This means that people may not disturb the sea turtles. Visitors must stay at least 25 feet away from the turtles. You may take photos of the turtles but do not engage these rare creatures. Leave the turtles to bask in the sun and enjoy the nature along with them.

Punalu'u Black Sand Beach Park - Big Island, Hawaii, USA

Punalu’u Black Sand Beach Park

 

KML-LogoFullscreen-LogoQR-code-logoGeoJSON-LogoGeoRSS-LogoWikitude-Logo
Big Island Beaches

loading map - please wait...

Anaehoomalu Bay: 19.916124, -155.893224
Hapuna Beach: 19.990617, -155.825596
Punaluu Black Sand Beach: 19.136057, -155.505065
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Anaehoomalu Bay
Big Island Beaches
Anaehoomalu Bay, Puako, HI, United States
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Hapuna Beach
Big Island Beaches
Hapuna Beach State Recreation Area, Waimea, HI, United States
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Punaluu Black Sand Beach
Big Island Beaches
Punaluu Black Sand Beach Park, Pahala, HI, United States

 

Share This:Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someonePrint this page

Introduction to the Big Island of Hawaii

Share This:Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someonePrint this page

Locals and visitors to the state of Hawaii can attest that Hawaii encapsulates tropical serenity. The views of paradise stretch from lush green hills to white sandy beaches and warm ocean waters. Hawaii’s main islands for tourists are Oahu, Kauai, Maui, and the Island of Hawaii. The Island of Hawaii, referred to as the Big Island, is the largest of the islands. Visitors to the Big Island will be in for a topographical shock. Other Hawaiian islands are awash in swaths of greenery. Upon landing on the Big Island you will notice lava rock stretching for miles. The lava rock throughout the island reminds you of the surface of the moon. Yet the entire island is not just visible lava rock. There are lush hills and green trees aplenty. The Island of Hawaii is diverse not only in its topography but in its climate. One could start their day at the top of Mauna Kea, a dormant volcano, and on this the tallest peak on the Big Island see snow. In the afternoon you can warm up by flying over an active volcano or sunbathe at a black sand beach with turtles. Regardless how one spends their time on the Big Island the best way to end the day is by watching a sunset at one of the soft white sand beaches.

The Big Island: Hilo and Kona

To reach this island paradise visitors will arrive at either of the two main cities, Hilo on the eastern side of the island and Kona on the west. The fastest way between the two cities cuts through the island and is a 77-mile drive taking an hour and forty minutes. Another route includes more time by the coast but is over 90-miles and takes closer to two hours to drive. As the two cities aren’t close most visitors will choose to stay in one city their entire time. Others will decide to begin their trip in one city and then end up in the other. Hilo and Kona have their own airports. If you wish to see both cities the most time economical approach is to fly into one city and fly out from the other city. Hilo leans more towards the local scene with bed and breakfasts. It is the city to stay in for those wishing to explore the Hawaii’s Volcanoes National Park. The Volcanoes National Park is an hour away from Hilo versus two and a half hours from Kona. Kona has big hotel resorts and is within driving distance of many coffee farms. Most tourists stay on the Kona side of the island. With a rental car staying in Kona affords you the luxury to visit coffee farms, beaches, scenic overlooks, and petroglyphs. Not to mention go shopping and explore the historic districts of Kailua Village and Kainaliu.

Kona International Airport - Big Island, Hawaii, USA

Kona International Airport

Kona International Airport

Kona International Airport is a tiny outdoor airport. Exiting your plane and feeling the warm island breeze is a great Hawaiian welcome. It’s not a perfect greeting when it’s raining so whether you are landing or waiting to leave keep an umbrella handy just in case. If you are renting a car follow the signs to the rental car van pick up location. You’ll be on your way to the rental car agency in no time. The airport has minimal shopping or dining options. When flying out if you plan on arriving early and want to eat at the airport consider bringing a lunch plate with you from a local restaurant.

Kiholo Bay Scenic Overlook - Big Island, Hawaii, USA

Kiholo Bay Scenic Overlook

Kona Scenic Overlooks

Routes 19 and 11 will be your primary highway arteries as you navigate the Kona coast. Each route has a scenic overlook worth the stop. On Route 19 the Kiholo Bay Scenic Overlook Point is a great place to view Kiholo Bay and the surrounding lava fields. On Route 11 is the Kona Coast Scenic Overlook. Besides the ocean view you will find the Ohi’a Lava Tube Caves. This historic preserve of lava tubes run underneath the ground from the spot of the overlook to the ocean. Although access to the tubes is off-limits the lava rock and ocean in the distance make for striking photos.

Waikoloa Petroglyph Preserve - Big Island, Hawaii, USA

Waikoloa Petroglyph Preserve

Kona Sights and Shopping

Close to the Waikoloa Beach Resorts is part of the Ala Loa Trail, or Kings Trail. This trail, once used for horse travel, leads travelers to the Waikoloa Petroglyph Preserve. At the Waikoloa Petroglyph Preserve you will find ancient rock carvings on sacred land. Visitors must stay on the well-marked trails, as tourists may not walk or climb on the sacred rocks. The trails are not paved so wear comfortable and sturdy shoes. Besides petroglyphs you will see cave shelters and rock shelters. For those staying at the Waikoloa Beach Resorts you will access the Kings Trail and Waikoloa Petroglyph Preserve by foot. Visitors from other hotels may park at the nearby Queens’ Market Place or Kings’ Shops. Shoppers will want to spend time exploring the stores and restaurants offered at both the Queens’ Market Place and Kings’ Shops.

Mokuaikaua Church - Big Island, Hawaii, USA

Mokuaikaua Church

Kona Historic Districts

The historic district of Kailua Village Kona is off Ali’I Drive. Ali’I Drive is where the Ironman Triathlon competition starts and finishes.   Kailua Village and Ali’I Drive have two historical buildings. Visitors will pass by the Huliheʻe Palace, a museum that was once a vacation home for Hawaiian royalty. Close by is Hawaii’s first church on the islands, Mokuaikaua Church. Visitors stroll along Ali’I Drive while enjoying the waterfront and exploring the various stores and restaurants. Kona’s Farmers Market is a favorite tourist stop with over forty vendors selling souvenirs, flowers, and fresh fruits.

Original Donkey Balls Factory and Store, Dirty Balls - Milk Chocolate Covered Mac Nuts - Kealakekua, Big Island, Hawaii, USA

Original Donkey Balls Factory and Store, Dirty Balls – Milk Chocolate Covered Mac Nuts

Another nearby historic district is Kainaliu off Route 11. Kainaliu is an old plantation town that is now home to specialty stores and restaurants. A popular store is the Original Donkey Balls Factory and Store. The store sells packets of various chocolate covered macadamia nuts named by using puns. You’ll find the labels on the packaging either hilarious or offensive. Puns aside the chocolate covered macadamia nuts inside the packages are delicious morsels that make for great souvenirs. Besides sweets The Original Donkey Balls Factory and Store sells a variety of BBQ rubs, packaged in the same witty style as the macadamia nuts.

KML-LogoFullscreen-LogoQR-code-logoGeoJSON-LogoGeoRSS-LogoWikitude-Logo
Introduction to the Big Island of Hawaii

loading map - please wait...

Mauna Kea: 19.820611, -155.468094
Hilo Airport: 19.718834, -155.041687
Kona International Airport: 19.736916, -156.042925
Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: 19.419370, -155.288497
Kiholo Bay Scenic Overlook Point: 19.841805, -155.921574
Kona Coast Scenic Overlook and Ohi\'a Lava Tube Caves: 19.574186, -155.958996
Waikoloa Petroglyph Preserve: 19.916992, -155.880135
Queens\' Market Place: 19.913617, -155.880590
Kings\' Shops: 19.916323, -155.882090
Kailua Village Kona: 19.637090, -155.990203
Huliheʻe Palace: 19.639334, -155.994352
Mokuaikaua Church: 19.639574, -155.993832
Kona Farmers Market: 19.637065, -155.991840
Kainaliu: 19.533105, -155.926751
Original Donkey Balls Factory and Store: 19.531545, -155.925824
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Mauna Kea
Introduction to the Big Island of Hawaii
Mauna Kea, Hawaii County, HI, United States
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Hilo Airport
Introduction to the Big Island of Hawaii
Hilo Airport, Kekuanaoa Street, Hilo, HI, United States
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Kona International Airport
Introduction to the Big Island of Hawaii
Kona International Airport, Kupipi Street, Kona, HI, United States
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Hawaii Volcanoes National Park
Introduction to the Big Island of Hawaii
Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, HI, United States
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Kiholo Bay Scenic Overlook Point
Introduction to the Big Island of Hawaii
Kīholo Bay, North Kona, HI, United States
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Kona Coast Scenic Overlook and Ohi'a Lava Tube Caves
Introduction to the Big Island of Hawaii
Keauhou, Alii Drive, Kailua-Kona, HI, United States
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Waikoloa Petroglyph Preserve
Introduction to the Big Island of Hawaii
Waikoloa Petroglyph Reserve, Waikoloa Village, HI, United States
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Queens' Market Place
Introduction to the Big Island of Hawaii
Queens' MarketPlace, Waikoloa Beach Drive, Waikoloa Village, HI, United States
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Kings' Shops
Introduction to the Big Island of Hawaii
Kings' Shops, Waikoloa Beach Drive, Waikoloa Village, HI, United States
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Kailua Village Kona
Introduction to the Big Island of Hawaii
Kailua Village, Kuakini Highway, Kona, HI, United States
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Huliheʻe Palace
Introduction to the Big Island of Hawaii
Hulihe‘e Palace, Kailua-Kona, HI, United States
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Mokuaikaua Church
Introduction to the Big Island of Hawaii
Mokuaikaua Church, Alii Drive, Kailua-Kona, HI, United States
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Kona Farmers Market
Introduction to the Big Island of Hawaii
Kona Farmers Market, Ali'i Drive, Kailua-Kona, HI, United States
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Kainaliu
Introduction to the Big Island of Hawaii
Kainaliu Union, Mamalahoa Highway, Kealakekua, HI, United States
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Original Donkey Balls Factory and Store
Introduction to the Big Island of Hawaii
Original Donkey Balls Factory and Store., Mamalahoa Highway, Kealakekua, HI, United States

 

Share This:Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someonePrint this page

A Hong Kong Day Trip

Share This:Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someonePrint this page

A great Hong Kong day trip is one where the experience differs from that of the districts of Hong Kong Island and Kowloon. Hong Kong is more than just city escapades through skyscrapers and shopping malls. Allocating part of your trip to visiting other districts of Hong Kong allows you the opportunity to see another side of Hong Kong. A Hong Kong day trip means seeing first hand a bustling fishing village or hiking lush green hills. You can pay homage to a gigantic Buddha or soak in Portuguese influence. These Hong Kong day trips give you a glimpse into how locals live on outlying islands. Four unique Hong Kong day trips are those to Cheung Chau, Lamma Island, Lantau Island, and Macau.

Boats in Cheung Chau's harbor - Hong Kong, China

Boats in Cheung Chau’s harbor

 

Cheung Chau

Cheung Chau is part of Hong Kong’s Island Districts. You reach Cheung Chau by boat in under an hour from Hong Kong Island’s Central Ferry Pier 5. Unlike Hong Kong Island or Kowloon, Cheung Chau is a bustling fishing village. The harbor is full of fisherman working on their boats. At the waterfront vendors sell fish at markets while restaurants serve up fresh seafood dishes. Besides seafood tourists will enjoy Cheung Chau’s narrow streets with their shops, bakeries, and food stalls. Cheung Chau may translate from Cantonese into “Long Island” yet the island itself is small enough to entice visitors for a few hours. This makes Cheung Chau a perfect island for those tourists on a time crunch but still wanting to explore one of Hong Kong’s outlying islands.

Check out our article on Cheung Chau for more on visiting this island: Cheung Chau: A Hong Kong Island

 

Part of the Lamma Island Famly Walk Trail - Hong Kong, China

Part of the Lamma Island Famly Walk Trail

 

Lamma Island

Lamma Island is one of Hong Kong’s largest islands and one of the closest to Hong Kong Island. The island’s proximity and size is why Lamma Island is a perfect day trip for those visiting Hong Kong. The lush green hills of Lamma Island and lack of vehicles makes this Hong Kong day trip a peaceful change of pace from Hong Kong Island and Kowloon. Lamma Island has two main villages, Sok Kwu Wan and Yung Shue Wan. These villages connect to one other by a concrete trail that takes 1-1/2 hours to walk. The trail has amazing views of the island and the surrounding waters. Besides the trail, Lamma Island has beaches that are great for hot days and restaurants that serve delicious seafood. Visitors will reach Lamma Island by boat in under an hour on direct sailings from Hong Kong Island’s Central Ferry Pier 4.

Check out our article on Lamma Island for more on visiting this island: Hong Kong’s Lamma Island

 

Tian Tan Buddha on Lantau Island - Hong Kong, China

Tian Tan Buddha on Lantau Island

 

Lantau Island

Lantau Island is Hong Kong’s largest island and one of its least populous islands. What draws visitors to Lantau Island is the giant Tian Tan Buddha. Located at the Po Lin Monastery this bronze Buddha is one of the largest seated outdoor Buddha statues in the world. Visitors can get closer to the Buddha by climbing a staircase consisting of 268 steps. Travel to the Monastery and Buddha begins by reaching Lantau Island using either MTR (Mass Transit Railway) or by boat. The MTR Station you need to arrive at is Tung Chung Station, Exit B. If you are traveling by boat you will leave from Hong Kong Island’s Central Ferry Pier 6 to Mui Wo. Once on Lantau Island you will travel on a gondola (Ngong Ping 360) or bus to the Po Lin Monastery and Tian Tan Buddha. The gondola ride leaves from the MTR Tung Chung Station and is a 25-minute ride. Buses from either MTR Tung Chung Station or Mui Wo Ferry Pier will get you to your destination in 40-minutes.

 

St. Paul Ruins - Macau, China

St. Paul Ruins – Macau

 

Macau

Of the four destinations listed in this article Macau is the only one not part of Hong Kong’s Islands District. In fact Macau isn’t part of Hong Kong but its own city. As Hong Kong was once under British rule, Macau was once part of Portugal. The mix of Portuguese and Chinese influence makes Macau an interesting Hong Kong day trip. To visit Macau from Hong Kong visitors must leave from the Macau Ferry Terminal on Hong Kong Island. The trip takes an hour by boat. Tourists will want to visit the ruins of St. Paul and the Kun Iam Statue and Temple. Besides the sights enjoy walking the mosaic-tiled streets amid buildings painted in calming shades of yellow, orange, and red colors. Take your time exploring the neighborhood’s shops and restaurants. A quirky spot to visit is the Macau Fisherman’s Wharf Convention and Exhibition Centre. The Centre’s buildings are replicas of ancient Greek and Chinese architecture. Visitors who gamble will enjoy Macau’s status as the Las Vegas of Asia. There are plenty of casinos to gamble at such as the Sands Macao, Wynn Macau, Venetian MacauMGM Grand Macau, and Casino Lisboa.

 

KML-LogoFullscreen-LogoQR-code-logoGeoJSON-LogoGeoRSS-LogoWikitude-Logo
Hong Kong Day Trips

loading map - please wait...

Cheung Chau: 22.201618, 114.026501
Lamma Island: 22.200006, 114.135017
Lantau Island: 22.253985, 113.904984
Macau: 22.198745, 113.543873
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Cheung Chau
Cheung Chau: A Hong Kong Island

and

A Hong Kong Day Trip

Cheung Chau, Hong Kong
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Lamma Island
Hong Kong’s Lamma Island

and

A Hong Kong Day Trip

Lamma Island, Hong Kong
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Lantau Island
A Hong Kong Day Trip
Tian Tan Buddha, Hong Kong
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Macau
A Hong Kong Day Trip
Macau

 

Share This:Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someonePrint this page

Cheung Chau: A Hong Kong Island

Share This:Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someonePrint this page

 

Cheung Chau - Hong Kong, China

Cheung Chau

 

Cheung Chau is part of Hong Kong’s Island Districts. Located less than an hour away from Hong Kong Island, Cheung Chau allows visitors a chance to glimpse a different side of Hong Kong.   Here in Cheung Chau is a bustling fishing village. The harbor is full of fisherman working on their boats. At the waterfront vendors sell fish at markets while restaurants serve up fresh seafood dishes. Besides seafood tourists will enjoy Cheung Chau’s narrow streets with their shops, bakeries, and food stalls. Cheung Chau may translate from Cantonese into “Long Island” yet the island itself is small enough to entice visitors for a few hours. This makes Cheung Chau a perfect island for those tourists on a time crunch but still wanting to explore one of Hong Kong’s outlying islands.

Central Ferry Pier 5 - Hong Kong, China

Central Ferry Pier 5 – Hong Kong Island

Cheung Chau Ferry Pier - Hong Kong, China

Cheung Chau Ferry Pier

 

The Ferry to Cheung Chau

Ferries to Cheung Chau leave from Hong Kong Island’s Central Ferry Pier 5. Departures are daily and either on the ordinary or fast service ferry. Ordinary service will get you to Cheung Chau in an hour while fast service will get you there in half an hour. Ticket prices vary depending on which ferry you board and if you travel Mondays to Saturdays or Sundays and public holidays. The most expensive fare is the adult fare on the fast ferry on Sundays and public holidays at $37.20 HKD ($4.80 USD). Ferries that leave from Hong Kong Island’s Central Ferry Pier 5 sail direct to Cheung Chau Ferry Pier.

Boats in Cheung Chau's harbor - Hong Kong, China

Boats in Cheung Chau’s harbor

Fisherman heading to his boat - Cheung Chau, Hong Kong, China

Fisherman heading to his boat

Bicycles along Cheung Chau's waterfront - Hong Kong, China

Bicycles along Cheung Chau’s waterfront

Dried Seafood - Cheung Chau, Hong Kong, China

Dried seafood for sale

Egg custard from a food vendor in Cheung Chau - Hong Kong, China

Egg custard from a food vendor

San Hing Praya Street - Cheung Chau, Hong Kong, China

San Hing Praya Street

 

Arrival in Cheung Chau

The moment you disembark the ferry on Cheung Chau the famous golden arches of McDonald’s will greet you. This fast-food restaurant is on the main road called San Hing Praya Street. If possible resist this American temptation and look back towards the water where you will see an overabundance of boats and fisherman. There aren’t many docks along the waterfront and fisherman make their way back to land on floating platforms attached to shore by ropes. Cheung Chau is an active fishing village and if you are a fan of seafood you will want to save your appetite for dining options other than McDonald’s. Along San Hing Praya you’ll notice rows of bicycles belonging to the hard-working people of Cheung Chau. Cars are not allowed on Cheung Chau so locals use bicycles or small-motorized carts to travel around the island. Continue your introduction to Cheung Chau by exploring San Hing Praya Street. Here you will find shops with souvenirs and food stalls where you can buy dried seafood or desserts such as mochi or egg custard. At the end of San Hing Praya Street is Pak She Praya Road. This road is full of restaurants selling seafood and this section of town is a great place to eat a meal at if you are hungry.

Pak Tai Temple - Cheung Chau, Hong Kong, China

Pak Tai Temple

An altar inside the Pak Tai Temple - Cheung Chau, Hong Kong, China

An altar inside the Pak Tai Temple

 

Cheung Chau Temple

From the Cheung Chau Ferry Pier turn left on San Hing Praya Street. Turn right past the playground at Pak She Third Lane. This street will take you to one of the main temples on the island, Pak Tai Temple. Walk Pak She Third Lane until you reach Pak Tai Temple on the right-hand side. The temple is open to the public but remember, be respectful inside this holy place of worship. Dedicated to the Taoist God of the Sea the temple has four stone lions that great you as you ascend the steps to the shrine. Before entering the temple notice the ornate statues of dragons at the top of the temple. Throughout the temple you will see various figurines and murals such as that of a tiger and their cub.

Steamed buns sold by a street vendor in Hong Kong, China

Steamed buns sold by a street vendor

Tung Wan Beach - Cheung Chau, Hong Kong, China

Tung Wan Beach

 

Tung Wan Beach

From Pak Tai Temple you will walk towards the direction you came, but this time on Pak She Street and San Hing Street. These streets include bakeries selling various steamed buns and food stalls selling different flavored fish balls. From the food stalls and stores take either Kwok Man Road or Tung Wan Road towards Tung Wan Beach. This beach is popular with tourists and locals alike on hot days.   After you’ve enjoyed the sun, water, and sand continue exploring the various streets around Tung Wan Beach. Along these streets are stores used by locals such as apothecaries, grocery stores, and stores selling household goods. As you walk among the streets notice the small altars dedicated to various deities.

A street in Cheung Chau - Hong Kong, China

A street in Cheung Chau

An altar in the streets of Cheung Chau - Hong Kong, China

An altar in the streets of Cheung Chau

 

Tai Hing Tai Road

Make your way through the various streets, heading past the Cheung Chau Ferry Pier and on to Tai Hing Tai Road. On Tai Hing Tai Road is Cheung Chau Market. Inside are various vendors selling meats, seafood, and fruits to locals. Around the market are hawker style food stalls and restaurants. Pick any of the restaurants to eat at and enjoy fresh seafood dishes such as salt and pepper crab or seafood combination fried rice.

Cheung Chau Market - Hong Kong, China

Cheung Chau Market

Salt and pepper crab - Cheung Chau, Hong Kong, China

Salt and pepper crab

Seafood combination fried rice - Cheung Chau, Hong Kong, China

Seafood combination fried rice

After your delicious seafood meal continue to explore the various streets before heading back to Cheung Chau Ferry Pier. Here at Cheung Chau Ferry Pier you will catch your boat ride back to Hong Kong Island.

KML-LogoFullscreen-LogoQR-code-logoGeoJSON-LogoGeoRSS-LogoWikitude-Logo
Cheung Chau

loading map - please wait...

Cheung Chau Ferry Pier: 22.208517, 114.028364
San Hing Praya Street: 22.209453, 114.028527
Pak Tai Temple: 22.212387, 114.027883
Tung Wan Beach: 22.210419, 114.029939
Tai Hing Tai Road: 22.205559, 114.026941
Cheung Chau Market: 22.206856, 114.028119
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Cheung Chau Ferry Pier
Cheung Chau: A Hong Kong Island
Cheung Chau Ferry Pier, Hong Kong
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
San Hing Praya Street
Cheung Chau: A Hong Kong Island
San Hing Praya Street, Hong Kong
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Pak Tai Temple
Cheung Chau: A Hong Kong Island
Pak Tai Temple, Cheung Chau, Hong Kong
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Tung Wan Beach
Cheung Chau: A Hong Kong Island
Tung Wan Beach, Hong Kong
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Tai Hing Tai Road
Cheung Chau: A Hong Kong Island
Tai Hing Tai Road, Hong Kong
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Cheung Chau Market
Cheung Chau: A Hong Kong Island
Cheung Chau Market, Hong Kong

 

Share This:Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someonePrint this page

Natural Portland

Share This:Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someonePrint this page

 

Oregon’s city of Portland and the surrounding towns have much to offer both the active and passive nature lovers. Within walking distance from the city center is Washington Park. Washington Park includes the International Rose Test Garden and the Portland Japanese Garden. To experience even more nature within driving distance is Multnomah Falls, Wahkeena Falls, and Vista House on Crown Point.

Washington Park

By car Washington Park is a ten-minute drive from the Downtown district of Portland. It is a thirty-minute walk from the center of Portland to the section of Washington Park that leads to the International Rose Test Garden and the Portland Japanese Garden. The walk is uphill and a great workout, and if you’ve walked the hills in San Francisco before the walk won’t be a challenge. The walk is an opportunity to see quaint residential homes along the way. After walking through the nice neighborhoods at the top of the hills you’ll find yourself at the intersection of SW Park Place and SW Lewis Clark Way. The entrance found here into Washington Park will lead you into the midst of sprawling trees and a playground. Washington Park has plenty of attractions such as the Oregon Zoo, an arboretum, children’s museum, memorials, and gardens.

Statue of Sacajawea and her son Jean-Baptiste found in Washington Park - Portland, Oregon

Statue of Sacajawea and her son Jean-Baptiste found in Washington Park

International Rose Test Garden

One of the main attractions of Washington Park is the International Rose Test Garden. This is the oldest public garden of its kind in the United States. The garden has over 500 varieties of roses and more than 7,000 plantings. This section of the park is free for visitors so you can spend whatever time you want during the garden’s open hours strolling through the various roses. Your experience of the roses will differ depending on the time of year you visit. Fall and winter months the garden does not offer much in the way of roses. Visit the garden during the spring and summer months and the roses will be in full bloom.

International Rose Test Garden in winter - Portland, Oregon

International Rose Test Garden in winter

International Rose Test Garden in summer - Portland, Oregon

International Rose Test Garden in summer

Portland Japanese Garden

Next to the International Rose Test Garden is the Portland Japanese Garden. To access this sight you will need to pay an entrance fee but what you pay is well worth the cost. The Japanese Gardens are well manicured and offer a different experience depending on the season and weather. In the wintertime the frost and snow settles along the various rocks, plants, and statues. During the fall months the turning of the leaves creates a colorful landscape. Spring and summer the plants are green and vivid. Wander the various lanes past ponds full of koi, small waterfalls, and rock gardens. The Japanese Garden has a lookout point with a magnificent view of Portland’s city skyline and Mount Hood. Please note that according to their website the Japanese Garden is closed from September 8, 2015 until March 1, 2016 due to construction for their Cultural Crossing expansion project. While the Japanese Garden itself will re-open in March the Cultural Crossing expansion construction will continue with an estimated completion of Spring 2017.

Portland Japanese Garden in winter - Portland, Oregon

Portland Japanese Garden in winter

Multnomah Falls and Wahkeena Falls

Multnomah Falls is a forty-minute drive from either Downtown Portland or Portland International Airport (PDX). The drive is worthwhile especially since it’s one of the few places in the world where one can drive up to a waterfall. There is no need to hike any trails since the parking lot is a short walk to where you can see the waterfall in its glory. A short non-strenuous walk up to a bridge offers a closer view of the waterfall. In the wintertime you will need to be cautious walking as icy conditions may cause you to loose your footing. A mile away from Multnomah Falls is Wahkeena Falls. The easily accessible part of Wahkeena Falls isn’t as dramatic as Multnomah Falls, but is a more rambling waterfall. Although Wahkeena is not a plunging waterfall the water with the trees and plants is worth a photograph. For more spectacular views of Wahkeena Falls hikers may walk the mile round-trip on the Wahkeena Trail.

Multnomah Falls - Oregon

Multnomah Falls

Wahkeena Falls - Oregon

Wahkeena Falls

Vista House on Crown Point

On the way to Multnomah Falls and Wahkeena Falls be sure to stop at Vista House on Crown Point. This spectacular lookout is located thirty-five minutes from Downtown Portland. Part of the Oregon State Parks, the Vista House has existed since the early 1900s. This observatory is located over 700 feet above the Columbia River and offers breathtaking views. Regardless if the weather is over cast or sunny this location is ideal for photographs. Be advised that if the weather has been extreme, for example too much snow has fallen, Crown Point may be closed off to tourists. On such days call ahead or visit their website to find out if the lookout is open.

Vista House at Crown Point - Oregon

Vista House at Crown Point

View of the Columbia River from Vista House at Crown Point - Oregon

View of the Columbia River from Vista House at Crown Point

 

KML-LogoFullscreen-LogoQR-code-logoGeoJSON-LogoGeoRSS-LogoWikitude-Logo
Portland, Oregon

loading map - please wait...

Portland Building: 45.515663, -122.678500
Pearl District: 45.530209, -122.681204
Downtown, Portland: 45.513454, -122.680134
Pioneer Courthouse Square: 45.518300, -122.678905
Chinatown Gates: 45.523512, -122.674157
Washington Park: 45.512640, -122.712736
International Rose Garden: 45.518951, -122.705273
Portland Japanese Garden: 45.519136, -122.706780
Multnomah Falls: 45.576160, -122.115776
Wahkeena Falls: 45.574181, -122.127430
Vista House on Crown Point: 45.539579, -122.244446
Voodoo Doughnut ONE (original location): 45.522621, -122.673111
Caffe Vita: 45.522447, -122.672914
Pine State Biscuits: 45.558886, -122.642744
Gaufre Gourmet: 45.521057, -122.680316
KOi Fusion: 45.450419, -122.781197
Lardo: 45.522021, -122.683540
Toro Bravo: 45.540813, -122.663611
Pok Pok: 45.504565, -122.632159
Hopworks Urban Brewery (HUB): 45.496893, -122.634884
De Ponte Cellars: 45.262715, -123.058269
Domaine Drouhin: 45.265540, -123.055634
WillaKenzie Estate: 45.360877, -123.137926
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Portland Building
Portland: Keeping it Normal
Portland Building, Portland, OR, United States
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Pearl District
Portland: Keeping it Normal
Pearl District, Portland, OR, United States
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Downtown, Portland
Portland: Keeping it Normal
Downtown, Portland, OR, United States
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Pioneer Courthouse Square
Portland: Keeping it Normal
Pioneer Courthouse Square, Portland, OR, United States
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Chinatown Gates
Portland: Keeping it Normal
Chinatown Gates Portland, Northwest 4th Avenue, Portland, OR, United States
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Washington Park
Portland: Keeping it Normal
Natural Portland

Washington Park, Portland, OR, United States
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
International Rose Garden
Portland: Keeping it Normal
Natural Portland

International Rose Test Garden, Southwest Kingston Avenue, Portland, OR, United States
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Portland Japanese Garden
Portland: Keeping it Normal
Natural Portland

Portland Japanese Garden, Southwest Kingston Avenue, Portland, OR, United States
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Multnomah Falls
Portland: Keeping it Normal
Natural Portland

Multnomah Falls, Multnomah County, OR, United States
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Wahkeena Falls
Portland: Keeping it Normal
Natural Portland

Wahkeena Falls, Multnomah County, OR, United States
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Vista House on Crown Point
Portland: Keeping it Normal
Natural Portland

Vista House, Historic Columbia River Highway, Corbett, OR, United States
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Voodoo Doughnut ONE (original location)
Eat Your Way Through Portland
Voodoo Doughnut, Southwest 3rd Avenue, Portland, OR, United States
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Caffe Vita
Eat Your Way Through Portland
Caffe Vita, Southwest 3rd Avenue, Portland, OR, United States
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Pine State Biscuits
Eat Your Way Through Portland
Pine State Biscuits Alberta, Northeast Alberta Street, Portland, OR, United States
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Gaufre Gourmet
Eat Your Way Through Portland
Gaufre Gourmet, Southwest 9th Avenue, Portland, OR, United States
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
KOi Fusion
Eat Your Way Through Portland
Washington Square, Southwest Washington Square Road, Portland, OR, United States
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Lardo
Eat Your Way Through Portland
Lardo, Southwest Washington Street, Portland, OR, United States
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Toro Bravo
Eat Your Way Through Portland
Toro Bravo, Northeast Russell Street, Portland, OR, United States
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Pok Pok
Eat Your Way Through Portland
Pok Pok, Southeast Division Street, Portland, OR, United States
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Hopworks Urban Brewery (HUB)
Eat Your Way Through Portland
Hopworks Urban Brewery, Southeast Powell Boulevard, Portland, OR, United States
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
De Ponte Cellars
Eat Your Way Through Portland
De Ponte Cellars, Northeast Archery Summit Road, Dayton, OR, United States
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Domaine Drouhin
Eat Your Way Through Portland
Domaine Drouhin Oregon, Dayton, OR, United States
marker icon
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
WillaKenzie Estate
Eat Your Way Through Portland
WillaKenzie Estate, Northeast Laughlin Road, Yamhill, OR, United States

 

Share This:Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrEmail this to someonePrint this page